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Physiological predictors of increasing total and central adiposity in aging men and women.
Arch Intern Med 1995 Dec 11-25; 155(22):2443-8AI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Increasing levels of total and central body fat with advancing age contribute to the development of cardiovascular and metabolic disease. We examined gender-related differences and physiological predictors of the rate of increase in total and central body fat in men and women.

METHODS

We studied 427 healthy men (age range, 17 to 90 years) and 293 women (age range, 18 to 88 years). We measured body fatness by hydrostatic weighing, central adiposity from the waist circumference, peak volume of oxygen utilization (VO2) from a treadmill test, leisure time physical activity (LTA) from a questionnaire, resting metabolic rate and respiratory quotient from indirect calorimetry, and energy intake from 3-day food diaries.

RESULTS

Fat mass increased with age, and the rate was greater in women (r = .61; slope = 0.25 kg/y; P < .01) than in men (r = .43; slope = 0.16 kg/y; P < .01). Increasing fat mass in men and women was most strongly associated with declines in peak VO2 and LTA. Controlling for these variables reduced the increase in fat mass from 17% to 3% per decade in men and from 26% to 5% per decade in women. The increase in waist circumference with age was also greater in women (r = .53; slope = 0.28 cm/y) than in men (r = .39; slope = 0.18 cm/y; P < .01). Increasing waist circumference with age in men and women was most strongly associated with declines in LTA and peak VO2, respectively. Control for these variables reduced the age-related increase in waist circumference from 2% to 1% per decade in men and from 4% to 1% per decade in women. We observed no independent contribution of resting metabolic rate, respiratory quotient, menopause status, energy, or macronutrient intake to the age-related increase in fat mass and waist circumference.

CONCLUSIONS

Our findings suggest that (1) the age-related increase in fat mass and waist circumference is greater in women than in men and (2) the physiological characteristics that reflect a decline in physical activity-related energy expenditure, rather than resting energy expenditure, are important predictors of the increases in total and central fatness. Lifestyle changes that increase the level of physical activity may be advantageous in blunting age-related increases in total and central body fatness.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Baltimore Veterans Affairs Medical Center, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7503603

Citation

Poehlman, E T., et al. "Physiological Predictors of Increasing Total and Central Adiposity in Aging Men and Women." Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 155, no. 22, 1995, pp. 2443-8.
Poehlman ET, Toth MJ, Bunyard LB, et al. Physiological predictors of increasing total and central adiposity in aging men and women. Arch Intern Med. 1995;155(22):2443-8.
Poehlman, E. T., Toth, M. J., Bunyard, L. B., Gardner, A. W., Donaldson, K. E., Colman, E., ... Ades, P. A. (1995). Physiological predictors of increasing total and central adiposity in aging men and women. Archives of Internal Medicine, 155(22), pp. 2443-8.
Poehlman ET, et al. Physiological Predictors of Increasing Total and Central Adiposity in Aging Men and Women. Arch Intern Med. 1995;155(22):2443-8. PubMed PMID: 7503603.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Physiological predictors of increasing total and central adiposity in aging men and women. AU - Poehlman,E T, AU - Toth,M J, AU - Bunyard,L B, AU - Gardner,A W, AU - Donaldson,K E, AU - Colman,E, AU - Fonong,T, AU - Ades,P A, PY - 1995/12/11/pubmed PY - 1995/12/11/medline PY - 1995/12/11/entrez SP - 2443 EP - 8 JF - Archives of internal medicine JO - Arch. Intern. Med. VL - 155 IS - 22 N2 - BACKGROUND: Increasing levels of total and central body fat with advancing age contribute to the development of cardiovascular and metabolic disease. We examined gender-related differences and physiological predictors of the rate of increase in total and central body fat in men and women. METHODS: We studied 427 healthy men (age range, 17 to 90 years) and 293 women (age range, 18 to 88 years). We measured body fatness by hydrostatic weighing, central adiposity from the waist circumference, peak volume of oxygen utilization (VO2) from a treadmill test, leisure time physical activity (LTA) from a questionnaire, resting metabolic rate and respiratory quotient from indirect calorimetry, and energy intake from 3-day food diaries. RESULTS: Fat mass increased with age, and the rate was greater in women (r = .61; slope = 0.25 kg/y; P < .01) than in men (r = .43; slope = 0.16 kg/y; P < .01). Increasing fat mass in men and women was most strongly associated with declines in peak VO2 and LTA. Controlling for these variables reduced the increase in fat mass from 17% to 3% per decade in men and from 26% to 5% per decade in women. The increase in waist circumference with age was also greater in women (r = .53; slope = 0.28 cm/y) than in men (r = .39; slope = 0.18 cm/y; P < .01). Increasing waist circumference with age in men and women was most strongly associated with declines in LTA and peak VO2, respectively. Control for these variables reduced the age-related increase in waist circumference from 2% to 1% per decade in men and from 4% to 1% per decade in women. We observed no independent contribution of resting metabolic rate, respiratory quotient, menopause status, energy, or macronutrient intake to the age-related increase in fat mass and waist circumference. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that (1) the age-related increase in fat mass and waist circumference is greater in women than in men and (2) the physiological characteristics that reflect a decline in physical activity-related energy expenditure, rather than resting energy expenditure, are important predictors of the increases in total and central fatness. Lifestyle changes that increase the level of physical activity may be advantageous in blunting age-related increases in total and central body fatness. SN - 0003-9926 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7503603/Physiological_predictors_of_increasing_total_and_central_adiposity_in_aging_men_and_women_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/vol/155/pg/2443 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -