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Cholera: current epidemiology.
Commun Dis Rep CDR Rev. 1994 Dec 09; 4(13):R157-64.CD

Abstract

Cholera remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Its epidemiology has changed in the 1990s, with the spread of the seventh pandemic to the western hemisphere and the emergence of a new serogroup, Vibrio cholerae O139. The spread of cholera may be rapid and unpredictable because of aeroplane travel, international shipping, and the migration of people due to war or political unrest. Increasing amounts of largely untreated faeces from growing human populations favour cholera's survival. Most of the world has inadequate sanitation, and future prospects are undermined by the impact of international debt on ailing economies. Furthermore, because cholera is difficult to eradicate from water it is likely to remain a serious threat to public health for some time. Progress is being made in the development of oral vaccines against V. cholerae O1 and serogroup O139.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Public Health Sciences, St George's Hospital Medical School, London.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7531564

Citation

Crowcroft, N S.. "Cholera: Current Epidemiology." Communicable Disease Report. CDR Review, vol. 4, no. 13, 1994, pp. R157-64.
Crowcroft NS. Cholera: current epidemiology. Commun Dis Rep CDR Rev. 1994;4(13):R157-64.
Crowcroft, N. S. (1994). Cholera: current epidemiology. Communicable Disease Report. CDR Review, 4(13), R157-64.
Crowcroft NS. Cholera: Current Epidemiology. Commun Dis Rep CDR Rev. 1994 Dec 9;4(13):R157-64. PubMed PMID: 7531564.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cholera: current epidemiology. A1 - Crowcroft,N S, PY - 1994/12/9/pubmed PY - 1994/12/9/medline PY - 1994/12/9/entrez SP - R157 EP - 64 JF - Communicable disease report. CDR review JO - Commun Dis Rep CDR Rev VL - 4 IS - 13 N2 - Cholera remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Its epidemiology has changed in the 1990s, with the spread of the seventh pandemic to the western hemisphere and the emergence of a new serogroup, Vibrio cholerae O139. The spread of cholera may be rapid and unpredictable because of aeroplane travel, international shipping, and the migration of people due to war or political unrest. Increasing amounts of largely untreated faeces from growing human populations favour cholera's survival. Most of the world has inadequate sanitation, and future prospects are undermined by the impact of international debt on ailing economies. Furthermore, because cholera is difficult to eradicate from water it is likely to remain a serious threat to public health for some time. Progress is being made in the development of oral vaccines against V. cholerae O1 and serogroup O139. SN - 1350-9349 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7531564/Cholera:_current_epidemiology_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/1345 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -