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Repeated inhalation challenge with exogenous and endogenous histamine released by acetaldehyde inhalation in asthmatic patients.
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1995 Aug; 152(2):456-60.AJ

Abstract

We previously reported that inhaled acetaldehyde, a metabolite of ethanol and a main factor in alcohol-induced asthma, causes bronchoconstriction indirectly through endogenously released histamine in asthmatic subjects. No study has examined the difference between tachyphylaxis in response to endogenous as opposed to exogenous histamine. Therefore, we examined tachyphylaxis occurring in response to repeated inhalation of histamine or acetaldehyde in nine asthmatic subjects. The mean acetaldehyde concentration causing a 20% decrease in FEV1 increased significantly from 18.4 (geometric standard error of the mean (GSEM = 0.14) to 45.2 (GSEM = 0.14) mg/ml over a period of 1 h (p < 0.002), whereas the mean histamine concentrations causing a 20% decrease in FEV1 were identical. No correlations were observed between the change in bronchial responsiveness to each solution and the change in baseline FEV1. These results suggest that tachyphylaxis in response to histamine is observed only when the latter is released endogenously. We believe that this is the first report suggesting tachyphylaxis caused by endogenous histamine.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Third Department of Internal Medicine, Kanazawa University School of Medicine, Japan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7543344

Citation

Myou, S, et al. "Repeated Inhalation Challenge With Exogenous and Endogenous Histamine Released By Acetaldehyde Inhalation in Asthmatic Patients." American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, vol. 152, no. 2, 1995, pp. 456-60.
Myou S, Fujimura M, Kamio Y, et al. Repeated inhalation challenge with exogenous and endogenous histamine released by acetaldehyde inhalation in asthmatic patients. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1995;152(2):456-60.
Myou, S., Fujimura, M., Kamio, Y., Bando, T., Nakatsumi, Y., & Matsuda, T. (1995). Repeated inhalation challenge with exogenous and endogenous histamine released by acetaldehyde inhalation in asthmatic patients. American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 152(2), 456-60.
Myou S, et al. Repeated Inhalation Challenge With Exogenous and Endogenous Histamine Released By Acetaldehyde Inhalation in Asthmatic Patients. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1995;152(2):456-60. PubMed PMID: 7543344.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Repeated inhalation challenge with exogenous and endogenous histamine released by acetaldehyde inhalation in asthmatic patients. AU - Myou,S, AU - Fujimura,M, AU - Kamio,Y, AU - Bando,T, AU - Nakatsumi,Y, AU - Matsuda,T, PY - 1995/8/1/pubmed PY - 1995/8/1/medline PY - 1995/8/1/entrez SP - 456 EP - 60 JF - American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine JO - Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med. VL - 152 IS - 2 N2 - We previously reported that inhaled acetaldehyde, a metabolite of ethanol and a main factor in alcohol-induced asthma, causes bronchoconstriction indirectly through endogenously released histamine in asthmatic subjects. No study has examined the difference between tachyphylaxis in response to endogenous as opposed to exogenous histamine. Therefore, we examined tachyphylaxis occurring in response to repeated inhalation of histamine or acetaldehyde in nine asthmatic subjects. The mean acetaldehyde concentration causing a 20% decrease in FEV1 increased significantly from 18.4 (geometric standard error of the mean (GSEM = 0.14) to 45.2 (GSEM = 0.14) mg/ml over a period of 1 h (p < 0.002), whereas the mean histamine concentrations causing a 20% decrease in FEV1 were identical. No correlations were observed between the change in bronchial responsiveness to each solution and the change in baseline FEV1. These results suggest that tachyphylaxis in response to histamine is observed only when the latter is released endogenously. We believe that this is the first report suggesting tachyphylaxis caused by endogenous histamine. SN - 1073-449X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7543344/Repeated_inhalation_challenge_with_exogenous_and_endogenous_histamine_released_by_acetaldehyde_inhalation_in_asthmatic_patients_ L2 - http://www.atsjournals.org/doi/full/10.1164/ajrccm.152.2.7543344?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -