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[Cauda equina cavernous hemangioma associated with hydrocephalus--case report].
No To Shinkei. 1995 Aug; 47(8):783-7.NT

Abstract

Spinal cavernous hemangioma is rare, and it is extremely rare for cavernous hemangioma to develop in the cauda equina. There has been only one report of hydrocephalus associated with cavernous hemangioma in the cauda equina. We report a case of cavernous hemangioma in the cauda equina diagnosed on the basis of the headaches due to hydrocephalus. A 67-year-old man was being treated for Parkinson's disease because of tremor of both upper extremities for several years. In December 1991 he complained of occasional headaches. On February 15, 1992 the headaches became severe and frequent, with nausea and vomiting, and his gait became unsteady. Four days later he came to our hospital. Neurological examination revealed fine finger tremor and truncal ataxia. Computerized tomography scanning and magnetic resonance imaging of the head revealed ventricular enlargement, but there were no mass lesions obstructing the cerebrospinal fluid pathway. Lumbar puncture at the L3-L4 level yielded bloody cerebrospinal fluid, and the pressure had increased to 410 mmH2O. Cerebral angiography showed no abnormal findings. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine demonstrated an intradural tumor at the level of vertebral body L2. Spinal angiography showed no evidence of abnormal vascularity in the mass at the L2 level. On March 10, 1992, laminectomy at three levels, L1 to L3 was performed, and a well-defined blueberry-like intra-cauda equina tumor 1 cm. in diameter, was removed. One spinal nerve root passed through the tumor. The pathological diagnosis was cavernous hemangioma. After removal of the tumor, the patient's headaches improved, and a follow-up computerized tomography scan six months later showed normal ventricle size.(

ABSTRACT

TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurosurgery, Asahikawa Red Cross Hospital, Japan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
English Abstract
Journal Article

Language

jpn

PubMed ID

7546925

Citation

Makino, K, et al. "[Cauda Equina Cavernous Hemangioma Associated With Hydrocephalus--case Report]." No to Shinkei = Brain and Nerve, vol. 47, no. 8, 1995, pp. 783-7.
Makino K, Takamura H, Gotoh S, et al. [Cauda equina cavernous hemangioma associated with hydrocephalus--case report]. No To Shinkei. 1995;47(8):783-7.
Makino, K., Takamura, H., Gotoh, S., & Andoh, M. (1995). [Cauda equina cavernous hemangioma associated with hydrocephalus--case report]. No to Shinkei = Brain and Nerve, 47(8), 783-7.
Makino K, et al. [Cauda Equina Cavernous Hemangioma Associated With Hydrocephalus--case Report]. No To Shinkei. 1995;47(8):783-7. PubMed PMID: 7546925.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Cauda equina cavernous hemangioma associated with hydrocephalus--case report]. AU - Makino,K, AU - Takamura,H, AU - Gotoh,S, AU - Andoh,M, PY - 1995/8/1/pubmed PY - 1995/8/1/medline PY - 1995/8/1/entrez SP - 783 EP - 7 JF - No to shinkei = Brain and nerve JO - No To Shinkei VL - 47 IS - 8 N2 - Spinal cavernous hemangioma is rare, and it is extremely rare for cavernous hemangioma to develop in the cauda equina. There has been only one report of hydrocephalus associated with cavernous hemangioma in the cauda equina. We report a case of cavernous hemangioma in the cauda equina diagnosed on the basis of the headaches due to hydrocephalus. A 67-year-old man was being treated for Parkinson's disease because of tremor of both upper extremities for several years. In December 1991 he complained of occasional headaches. On February 15, 1992 the headaches became severe and frequent, with nausea and vomiting, and his gait became unsteady. Four days later he came to our hospital. Neurological examination revealed fine finger tremor and truncal ataxia. Computerized tomography scanning and magnetic resonance imaging of the head revealed ventricular enlargement, but there were no mass lesions obstructing the cerebrospinal fluid pathway. Lumbar puncture at the L3-L4 level yielded bloody cerebrospinal fluid, and the pressure had increased to 410 mmH2O. Cerebral angiography showed no abnormal findings. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine demonstrated an intradural tumor at the level of vertebral body L2. Spinal angiography showed no evidence of abnormal vascularity in the mass at the L2 level. On March 10, 1992, laminectomy at three levels, L1 to L3 was performed, and a well-defined blueberry-like intra-cauda equina tumor 1 cm. in diameter, was removed. One spinal nerve root passed through the tumor. The pathological diagnosis was cavernous hemangioma. After removal of the tumor, the patient's headaches improved, and a follow-up computerized tomography scan six months later showed normal ventricle size.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) SN - 0006-8969 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7546925/[Cauda_equina_cavernous_hemangioma_associated_with_hydrocephalus__case_report]_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/3270 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -