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Housing subsidies and pediatric undernutrition.
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 1995 Oct; 149(10):1079-84.AP

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To test the hypothesis that receipt of housing subsidies by poor families is associated with improved nutritional status of their children.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional study.

SETTING

Pediatric emergency department of an urban municipal hospital.

PATIENTS

Convenience sample of 203 children younger than 3 years and their families who were being seen during one of twenty-seven 24-hour periods.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Anthropometric indicators (z scores of weight for age, weight-for-height, and height-for-age), and the proportion of children with low growth indicator (weight-for-height below the 10th percentile or height-for-age below the fifth percentile, or both, of the reference population).

RESULTS

Multivariate analysis controlling for demographics and program participation showed that receipt of housing assistance contributed significantly to z scores for weight-for-age (P = .03) and weight-for-height (P = .04). The risk of a child's having low growth indicators was 21.6% for children whose families were on the waiting list for housing assistance compared with 3.3% for those whose families received subsidies (adjusted odds ratio = 8.2, 95% confidence interval = 2.2 to 30.4, P = .002)

CONCLUSION

Receiving a housing subsidy is associated with increased growth in children from low-income families, an effect that is consistent with a protective effect of housing subsidies against childhood undernutrition.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of General Pediatrics, Boston (Mass) City Hospital, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7550809

Citation

Meyers, A, et al. "Housing Subsidies and Pediatric Undernutrition." Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, vol. 149, no. 10, 1995, pp. 1079-84.
Meyers A, Frank DA, Roos N, et al. Housing subsidies and pediatric undernutrition. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 1995;149(10):1079-84.
Meyers, A., Frank, D. A., Roos, N., Peterson, K. E., Casey, V. A., Cupples, L. A., & Levenson, S. M. (1995). Housing subsidies and pediatric undernutrition. Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, 149(10), 1079-84.
Meyers A, et al. Housing Subsidies and Pediatric Undernutrition. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 1995;149(10):1079-84. PubMed PMID: 7550809.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Housing subsidies and pediatric undernutrition. AU - Meyers,A, AU - Frank,D A, AU - Roos,N, AU - Peterson,K E, AU - Casey,V A, AU - Cupples,L A, AU - Levenson,S M, PY - 1995/10/1/pubmed PY - 1995/10/1/medline PY - 1995/10/1/entrez SP - 1079 EP - 84 JF - Archives of pediatrics & adolescent medicine JO - Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med VL - 149 IS - 10 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that receipt of housing subsidies by poor families is associated with improved nutritional status of their children. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Pediatric emergency department of an urban municipal hospital. PATIENTS: Convenience sample of 203 children younger than 3 years and their families who were being seen during one of twenty-seven 24-hour periods. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Anthropometric indicators (z scores of weight for age, weight-for-height, and height-for-age), and the proportion of children with low growth indicator (weight-for-height below the 10th percentile or height-for-age below the fifth percentile, or both, of the reference population). RESULTS: Multivariate analysis controlling for demographics and program participation showed that receipt of housing assistance contributed significantly to z scores for weight-for-age (P = .03) and weight-for-height (P = .04). The risk of a child's having low growth indicators was 21.6% for children whose families were on the waiting list for housing assistance compared with 3.3% for those whose families received subsidies (adjusted odds ratio = 8.2, 95% confidence interval = 2.2 to 30.4, P = .002) CONCLUSION: Receiving a housing subsidy is associated with increased growth in children from low-income families, an effect that is consistent with a protective effect of housing subsidies against childhood undernutrition. SN - 1072-4710 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7550809/Housing_subsidies_and_pediatric_undernutrition_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapediatrics/fullarticle/vol/149/pg/1079 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -