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The long-term psychosocial effects of infertility.
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 1995 Jul-Aug; 24(6):517-22.JO

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To explore the psychosocial effects of infertility and the role that social support plays over time. The major hypothesis was that although infertile persons report less contentment, lower levels of marital and sexual satisfaction, and lower self-esteem over time, those with higher levels of social support will be less affected.

DESIGN/SETTING

Four questionnaires were completed in subjects' own homes, one every 9 months.

PARTICIPANTS

Subjects, all of whom perceived themselves as infertile, were recruited through the national newsletter for an infertility support group. Ninety-four subjects entered the study, and 41% of the sample completed it.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Contentment, marital satisfaction, sexual satisfaction, self-esteem, sex-role identity, press (the measure of perceived internal and external pressures), and social support.

RESULTS

Perceived support (F[3, 111] = 4.77, p < 0.004), as well as contentment and self-esteem, significantly increased over time (F[3, 111] = 12.03, p < 0.0001, and F[3, 111] = 5.378, p < 0.002, respectively). Social support was positively correlated with all dependent measures.

CONCLUSIONS

Contrary to what was hypothesized, infertile persons experienced increased social support and greater contentment over time. As hypothesized, there was a significant positive relationship between social support and all dependent measures. The positive impact of social support, counseling, and the adoption of strategies to deal with the stress of infertility lends credence to the crucial role nurses can play in helping infertile couples cope.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Nursing, Pacific Lutheran University, Tacoma, WA 98447, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7562134

Citation

Hirsch, A M., and S M. Hirsch. "The Long-term Psychosocial Effects of Infertility." Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic, and Neonatal Nursing : JOGNN, vol. 24, no. 6, 1995, pp. 517-22.
Hirsch AM, Hirsch SM. The long-term psychosocial effects of infertility. J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 1995;24(6):517-22.
Hirsch, A. M., & Hirsch, S. M. (1995). The long-term psychosocial effects of infertility. Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic, and Neonatal Nursing : JOGNN, 24(6), 517-22.
Hirsch AM, Hirsch SM. The Long-term Psychosocial Effects of Infertility. J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 1995 Jul-Aug;24(6):517-22. PubMed PMID: 7562134.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The long-term psychosocial effects of infertility. AU - Hirsch,A M, AU - Hirsch,S M, PY - 1995/7/1/pubmed PY - 1995/7/1/medline PY - 1995/7/1/entrez SP - 517 EP - 22 JF - Journal of obstetric, gynecologic, and neonatal nursing : JOGNN JO - J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs VL - 24 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To explore the psychosocial effects of infertility and the role that social support plays over time. The major hypothesis was that although infertile persons report less contentment, lower levels of marital and sexual satisfaction, and lower self-esteem over time, those with higher levels of social support will be less affected. DESIGN/SETTING: Four questionnaires were completed in subjects' own homes, one every 9 months. PARTICIPANTS: Subjects, all of whom perceived themselves as infertile, were recruited through the national newsletter for an infertility support group. Ninety-four subjects entered the study, and 41% of the sample completed it. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Contentment, marital satisfaction, sexual satisfaction, self-esteem, sex-role identity, press (the measure of perceived internal and external pressures), and social support. RESULTS: Perceived support (F[3, 111] = 4.77, p < 0.004), as well as contentment and self-esteem, significantly increased over time (F[3, 111] = 12.03, p < 0.0001, and F[3, 111] = 5.378, p < 0.002, respectively). Social support was positively correlated with all dependent measures. CONCLUSIONS: Contrary to what was hypothesized, infertile persons experienced increased social support and greater contentment over time. As hypothesized, there was a significant positive relationship between social support and all dependent measures. The positive impact of social support, counseling, and the adoption of strategies to deal with the stress of infertility lends credence to the crucial role nurses can play in helping infertile couples cope. SN - 0884-2175 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7562134/The_long_term_psychosocial_effects_of_infertility_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0884-2175(15)33272-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -