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Quality of life in long-term cancer survivors.
Oncol Nurs Forum 1995; 22(6):915-22ON

Abstract

PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES

To describe the quality of life (QOL) of long-term cancer survivors.

DESIGN

Descriptive, mailed survey.

SETTING

Membership of the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship (NCCS), which is a nonprofit, peer-support network for people living with cancer.

SAMPLE

687 (57%) of the 1,200 members of NCCS completed the survey. The mean age of the sample was 49.6 years; 81% were female. The predominant cancer diagnoses were breast (43%), lymphoma (9%), ovarian (8%), and Hodgkin's disease (8%).

METHODS

Mailed survey using three instruments: a demographic tool, the Quality of Life-Cancer Survivors (QOL-CS) tool, and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G) tool.

MAIN RESEARCH VARIABLES

Subscale and individual items of QOL including physical, psychological, social, and spiritual well-being.

FINDINGS

Results include areas of positive effects for cancer survivors and continued demands of survivorship. Based on scoring of 0 (worst outcome) to 10 (best outcome), cancer survivors' mean QOL-CS subscores were 5.88 for psychological well-being, 6.59 for spiritual well-being, 6.62 for social well-being, and 7.78 for physical well-being. Several demographic factors (e.g., evidence of active disease; female gender; presence of spouse/partner or children; length of time since diagnosis; income) had significant influence on QOL.

CONCLUSIONS

Cancer survivors experienced altered lives and had needs related to fear of recurrence and facing the spiritual aspects of having survived a life-threatening illness.

IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE

The growing population of cancer survivors has long-term needs for nursing care that address multidimensional aspects of QOL.

Authors+Show Affiliations

City of Hope National Medical Center in Duarte, CA, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7567610

Citation

Ferrell, B R., et al. "Quality of Life in Long-term Cancer Survivors." Oncology Nursing Forum, vol. 22, no. 6, 1995, pp. 915-22.
Ferrell BR, Dow KH, Leigh S, et al. Quality of life in long-term cancer survivors. Oncol Nurs Forum. 1995;22(6):915-22.
Ferrell, B. R., Dow, K. H., Leigh, S., Ly, J., & Gulasekaram, P. (1995). Quality of life in long-term cancer survivors. Oncology Nursing Forum, 22(6), pp. 915-22.
Ferrell BR, et al. Quality of Life in Long-term Cancer Survivors. Oncol Nurs Forum. 1995;22(6):915-22. PubMed PMID: 7567610.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Quality of life in long-term cancer survivors. AU - Ferrell,B R, AU - Dow,K H, AU - Leigh,S, AU - Ly,J, AU - Gulasekaram,P, PY - 1995/7/1/pubmed PY - 1995/7/1/medline PY - 1995/7/1/entrez SP - 915 EP - 22 JF - Oncology nursing forum JO - Oncol Nurs Forum VL - 22 IS - 6 N2 - PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To describe the quality of life (QOL) of long-term cancer survivors. DESIGN: Descriptive, mailed survey. SETTING: Membership of the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship (NCCS), which is a nonprofit, peer-support network for people living with cancer. SAMPLE: 687 (57%) of the 1,200 members of NCCS completed the survey. The mean age of the sample was 49.6 years; 81% were female. The predominant cancer diagnoses were breast (43%), lymphoma (9%), ovarian (8%), and Hodgkin's disease (8%). METHODS: Mailed survey using three instruments: a demographic tool, the Quality of Life-Cancer Survivors (QOL-CS) tool, and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G) tool. MAIN RESEARCH VARIABLES: Subscale and individual items of QOL including physical, psychological, social, and spiritual well-being. FINDINGS: Results include areas of positive effects for cancer survivors and continued demands of survivorship. Based on scoring of 0 (worst outcome) to 10 (best outcome), cancer survivors' mean QOL-CS subscores were 5.88 for psychological well-being, 6.59 for spiritual well-being, 6.62 for social well-being, and 7.78 for physical well-being. Several demographic factors (e.g., evidence of active disease; female gender; presence of spouse/partner or children; length of time since diagnosis; income) had significant influence on QOL. CONCLUSIONS: Cancer survivors experienced altered lives and had needs related to fear of recurrence and facing the spiritual aspects of having survived a life-threatening illness. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE: The growing population of cancer survivors has long-term needs for nursing care that address multidimensional aspects of QOL. SN - 0190-535X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7567610/Quality_of_life_in_long_term_cancer_survivors_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/cancerlivingwithcancer.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -