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Bioavailability of phylloquinone and menaquinones after oral and colorectal administration in vitamin K-deficient rats.

Abstract

Rats were made vitamin K-deficient by feeding them a diet devoid of vitamin K and by rigorously preventing coprophagy. After one week, circulating prothrombin concentrations were between 5 and 10% of initial values, and various amounts of phylloquinone, menaquinone-4, and menaquinone-9 were given in a single dose either subcutaneously, orally, or colorectally. The relative 'vitamin K activities' of these compounds were assessed by comparing their ability to support prothrombin synthesis after subcutaneous injection. Intestinal and colonic absorption were deduced from the difference between subcutaneous and either oral or colorectal administration of the vitamers. It is concluded that the colonic absorption of all three forms of vitamin K is extremely poor, suggesting that physiological menaquinones in the colon do not contribute substantially to vitamin K status in rats. Furthermore, the stimulation of prothrombin synthesis by menaquinone-9 lasted much longer than that by the two other K-vitamers, resulting in a substantially higher 'vitamin K activity' of menaquinone-9.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Biochemistry, University of Limburg, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

    , ,

    Source

    Biochemical pharmacology 50:6 1995 Sep 07 pg 797-801

    MeSH

    Animals
    Biological Availability
    Hemostatics
    Intestinal Absorption
    Male
    Prothrombin
    Rats
    Vitamin K
    Vitamin K 1
    Vitamin K 2
    Vitamin K Deficiency

    Pub Type(s)

    Comparative Study
    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    7575640

    Citation

    Groenen-van Dooren, M M., et al. "Bioavailability of Phylloquinone and Menaquinones After Oral and Colorectal Administration in Vitamin K-deficient Rats." Biochemical Pharmacology, vol. 50, no. 6, 1995, pp. 797-801.
    Groenen-van Dooren MM, Ronden JE, Soute BA, et al. Bioavailability of phylloquinone and menaquinones after oral and colorectal administration in vitamin K-deficient rats. Biochem Pharmacol. 1995;50(6):797-801.
    Groenen-van Dooren, M. M., Ronden, J. E., Soute, B. A., & Vermeer, C. (1995). Bioavailability of phylloquinone and menaquinones after oral and colorectal administration in vitamin K-deficient rats. Biochemical Pharmacology, 50(6), pp. 797-801.
    Groenen-van Dooren MM, et al. Bioavailability of Phylloquinone and Menaquinones After Oral and Colorectal Administration in Vitamin K-deficient Rats. Biochem Pharmacol. 1995 Sep 7;50(6):797-801. PubMed PMID: 7575640.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Bioavailability of phylloquinone and menaquinones after oral and colorectal administration in vitamin K-deficient rats. AU - Groenen-van Dooren,M M, AU - Ronden,J E, AU - Soute,B A, AU - Vermeer,C, PY - 1995/9/7/pubmed PY - 1995/9/7/medline PY - 1995/9/7/entrez SP - 797 EP - 801 JF - Biochemical pharmacology JO - Biochem. Pharmacol. VL - 50 IS - 6 N2 - Rats were made vitamin K-deficient by feeding them a diet devoid of vitamin K and by rigorously preventing coprophagy. After one week, circulating prothrombin concentrations were between 5 and 10% of initial values, and various amounts of phylloquinone, menaquinone-4, and menaquinone-9 were given in a single dose either subcutaneously, orally, or colorectally. The relative 'vitamin K activities' of these compounds were assessed by comparing their ability to support prothrombin synthesis after subcutaneous injection. Intestinal and colonic absorption were deduced from the difference between subcutaneous and either oral or colorectal administration of the vitamers. It is concluded that the colonic absorption of all three forms of vitamin K is extremely poor, suggesting that physiological menaquinones in the colon do not contribute substantially to vitamin K status in rats. Furthermore, the stimulation of prothrombin synthesis by menaquinone-9 lasted much longer than that by the two other K-vitamers, resulting in a substantially higher 'vitamin K activity' of menaquinone-9. SN - 0006-2952 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7575640/Bioavailability_of_phylloquinone_and_menaquinones_after_oral_and_colorectal_administration_in_vitamin_K_deficient_rats_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/0006-2952(95)00202-B DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -