Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Determinants of bone mass in 10- to 26-year-old females: a twin study.
J Bone Miner Res 1995; 10(4):558-67JB

Abstract

This cross-sectional twin study aimed to quantify the roles of constitutional and lifestyle factors on bone mass in adolescent and young adult women. Areal bone density (BMD) at the lumbar spine, femoral neck, Ward's triangle, and total hip, total body bone mineral content (BMC), and lean mass and fat mass were measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in 215 female volunteer twin pairs (122 monozygotic [MZ], 93 dizygotic [DZ]) aged 10 to 26 years. Height, weight, menarchial history, dietary calcium intake, physical activity, current tobacco use, and alcohol consumption were determined by questionnaire. Mean BMD increased with age to around 16 years, when it reached a plateau. Within-pair differences in BMD at the lumbar spine (expressed as a percentage of the pair mean BMD) were univariately associated with pair differences in menarchial status (14 +/- 3%), height (0.7 +/- 0.1% per cm), weight (0.4 +/- 0.1% per kg), lean mass (1.0 +/- 0.1% per kg), and fat mass (0.5 +/- 0.1% per kg). Only menarchial status, height, and lean mass, however, were independent predictors. At the proximal femoral sites, within-pair BMD differences were associated with within-pair lean mass differences (1.0 to 1.1 +/- 0.2%/kg), and no other factor was significant. The same conclusions applied to within-pair differences in BMD/height. Total body BMC was independently associated with menarchial status, height, lean mass, and fat mass; the effects of the latter two variables were stronger in pairs both premenarchial. After adjusting for constitutional factors, no lifestyle factor was independently predictive. By reducing collinearity, the cotwin method clearly identified that lean mass, not fat mass, was the major independent determinant of bone mass at the hip, both pre- and postmenarche.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Melbourne, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Carlton, Victoria, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7610926

Citation

Young, D, et al. "Determinants of Bone Mass in 10- to 26-year-old Females: a Twin Study." Journal of Bone and Mineral Research : the Official Journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research, vol. 10, no. 4, 1995, pp. 558-67.
Young D, Hopper JL, Nowson CA, et al. Determinants of bone mass in 10- to 26-year-old females: a twin study. J Bone Miner Res. 1995;10(4):558-67.
Young, D., Hopper, J. L., Nowson, C. A., Green, R. M., Sherwin, A. J., Kaymakci, B., ... Wark, J. D. (1995). Determinants of bone mass in 10- to 26-year-old females: a twin study. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research : the Official Journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research, 10(4), pp. 558-67.
Young D, et al. Determinants of Bone Mass in 10- to 26-year-old Females: a Twin Study. J Bone Miner Res. 1995;10(4):558-67. PubMed PMID: 7610926.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Determinants of bone mass in 10- to 26-year-old females: a twin study. AU - Young,D, AU - Hopper,J L, AU - Nowson,C A, AU - Green,R M, AU - Sherwin,A J, AU - Kaymakci,B, AU - Smid,M, AU - Guest,C S, AU - Larkins,R G, AU - Wark,J D, PY - 1995/4/1/pubmed PY - 1995/4/1/medline PY - 1995/4/1/entrez SP - 558 EP - 67 JF - Journal of bone and mineral research : the official journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research JO - J. Bone Miner. Res. VL - 10 IS - 4 N2 - This cross-sectional twin study aimed to quantify the roles of constitutional and lifestyle factors on bone mass in adolescent and young adult women. Areal bone density (BMD) at the lumbar spine, femoral neck, Ward's triangle, and total hip, total body bone mineral content (BMC), and lean mass and fat mass were measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in 215 female volunteer twin pairs (122 monozygotic [MZ], 93 dizygotic [DZ]) aged 10 to 26 years. Height, weight, menarchial history, dietary calcium intake, physical activity, current tobacco use, and alcohol consumption were determined by questionnaire. Mean BMD increased with age to around 16 years, when it reached a plateau. Within-pair differences in BMD at the lumbar spine (expressed as a percentage of the pair mean BMD) were univariately associated with pair differences in menarchial status (14 +/- 3%), height (0.7 +/- 0.1% per cm), weight (0.4 +/- 0.1% per kg), lean mass (1.0 +/- 0.1% per kg), and fat mass (0.5 +/- 0.1% per kg). Only menarchial status, height, and lean mass, however, were independent predictors. At the proximal femoral sites, within-pair BMD differences were associated with within-pair lean mass differences (1.0 to 1.1 +/- 0.2%/kg), and no other factor was significant. The same conclusions applied to within-pair differences in BMD/height. Total body BMC was independently associated with menarchial status, height, lean mass, and fat mass; the effects of the latter two variables were stronger in pairs both premenarchial. After adjusting for constitutional factors, no lifestyle factor was independently predictive. By reducing collinearity, the cotwin method clearly identified that lean mass, not fat mass, was the major independent determinant of bone mass at the hip, both pre- and postmenarche. SN - 0884-0431 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7610926/Determinants_of_bone_mass_in_10__to_26_year_old_females:_a_twin_study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/jbmr.5650100408 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -