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Mothers' attitudes towards donated breastmilk in Jos, Nigeria.
J Hum Lact 1995; 11(2):93-6JH

Abstract

In many developing countries, the use of pooled human milk is not widely accepted. Six hundred eighty breastfeeding mothers were interviewed to ascertain their acceptance of donated breastmilk. Their attitudes toward stored breastmilk, human milk banking, and breastfeeding in the event of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positivity were solicited. About 71 percent would not accept donated breastmilk for their baby while the rest would consent only if the donor were a close family relative, owing to fear of transfer of diseases (28 percent), fear of transfer of genetic traits (22 percent), and religious and cultural taboos (14 percent). However, 60 percent were willing to donate breastmilk. Only 38 percent would accept milk from a breastmilk bank. None would breastfeed if she were HIV positive.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7619300

Citation

Ighogboja, I S., et al. "Mothers' Attitudes Towards Donated Breastmilk in Jos, Nigeria." Journal of Human Lactation : Official Journal of International Lactation Consultant Association, vol. 11, no. 2, 1995, pp. 93-6.
Ighogboja IS, Olarewaju RS, Odumodu CU, et al. Mothers' attitudes towards donated breastmilk in Jos, Nigeria. J Hum Lact. 1995;11(2):93-6.
Ighogboja, I. S., Olarewaju, R. S., Odumodu, C. U., & Okuonghae, H. O. (1995). Mothers' attitudes towards donated breastmilk in Jos, Nigeria. Journal of Human Lactation : Official Journal of International Lactation Consultant Association, 11(2), pp. 93-6.
Ighogboja IS, et al. Mothers' Attitudes Towards Donated Breastmilk in Jos, Nigeria. J Hum Lact. 1995;11(2):93-6. PubMed PMID: 7619300.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Mothers' attitudes towards donated breastmilk in Jos, Nigeria. AU - Ighogboja,I S, AU - Olarewaju,R S, AU - Odumodu,C U, AU - Okuonghae,H O, PY - 1995/6/1/pubmed PY - 1995/6/1/medline PY - 1995/6/1/entrez KW - Africa KW - Africa South Of The Sahara KW - Attitude KW - Behavior KW - Biology KW - Breast Feeding KW - Cultural Background KW - Demographic Factors KW - Developing Countries KW - English Speaking Africa KW - Ethnic Groups KW - Family And Household KW - Family Characteristics KW - Family Relationships KW - Health KW - Human Milk KW - Infant Nutrition KW - Lactation KW - Maternal Physiology KW - Mothers KW - Nigeria KW - Nutrition KW - Parents KW - Physiology KW - Population KW - Population Characteristics KW - Psychological Factors KW - Research Methodology KW - Sampling Studies KW - Studies KW - Surveys KW - Western Africa SP - 93 EP - 6 JF - Journal of human lactation : official journal of International Lactation Consultant Association JO - J Hum Lact VL - 11 IS - 2 N2 - In many developing countries, the use of pooled human milk is not widely accepted. Six hundred eighty breastfeeding mothers were interviewed to ascertain their acceptance of donated breastmilk. Their attitudes toward stored breastmilk, human milk banking, and breastfeeding in the event of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positivity were solicited. About 71 percent would not accept donated breastmilk for their baby while the rest would consent only if the donor were a close family relative, owing to fear of transfer of diseases (28 percent), fear of transfer of genetic traits (22 percent), and religious and cultural taboos (14 percent). However, 60 percent were willing to donate breastmilk. Only 38 percent would accept milk from a breastmilk bank. None would breastfeed if she were HIV positive. SN - 0890-3344 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7619300/Mothers'_attitudes_towards_donated_breastmilk_in_Jos_Nigeria_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/089033449501100211?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -