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Neurobehavioural evaluation of Venezuelan workers exposed to inorganic lead.
Occup Environ Med. 1995 Jun; 52(6):408-14.OE

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To assess neurobehavioural effects of low exposure to lead, 43 workers from a lead smelter and 45 workers from a glass factory were evaluated with the World Health Organisation neurobehavioural core test battery (NCTB) in a cross sectional study.

METHODS

The NCTB comprises a questionnaire and seven tests that measure simple reaction time, short-term memory (digit span, Benton), mood (profile of mood states), eye-hand coordination (Santa Ana pegboard, pursuit aiming II), and perceptual speed (digit-symbol).

RESULTS

Smelter workers were employed on average for four years, and had a mean blood lead concentration of 2.0 mumol/l (42 micrograms/dl). Glass factory workers had a mean of 0.72 mumol/l (15 micrograms/dl). Historical blood lead concentrations were used to classify exposure based on current, peak, and time weighted average. Although the exposed workers performed less well than the non-exposed in 10 of 14 response variables, only profile of mood states tension-anxiety, hostility, and depression mood scales showed a significantly poorer dose-response relation with blood lead concentration in multiple linear regression models that included age, education, and alcohol intake as covariates. The frequency of symptoms of anger, depression, fatigue, and joint pain were also significantly increased in the exposed group.

CONCLUSION

This study is consistent with the larger body of neurobehavioural research of low occupational exposure to lead. The small effects found in this study occurred at blood lead concentrations slightly lower than those reported in several previous studies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of California, Berkeley, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7627319

Citation

Maizlish, N A., et al. "Neurobehavioural Evaluation of Venezuelan Workers Exposed to Inorganic Lead." Occupational and Environmental Medicine, vol. 52, no. 6, 1995, pp. 408-14.
Maizlish NA, Parra G, Feo O. Neurobehavioural evaluation of Venezuelan workers exposed to inorganic lead. Occup Environ Med. 1995;52(6):408-14.
Maizlish, N. A., Parra, G., & Feo, O. (1995). Neurobehavioural evaluation of Venezuelan workers exposed to inorganic lead. Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 52(6), 408-14.
Maizlish NA, Parra G, Feo O. Neurobehavioural Evaluation of Venezuelan Workers Exposed to Inorganic Lead. Occup Environ Med. 1995;52(6):408-14. PubMed PMID: 7627319.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Neurobehavioural evaluation of Venezuelan workers exposed to inorganic lead. AU - Maizlish,N A, AU - Parra,G, AU - Feo,O, PY - 1995/6/1/pubmed PY - 1995/6/1/medline PY - 1995/6/1/entrez SP - 408 EP - 14 JF - Occupational and environmental medicine JO - Occup Environ Med VL - 52 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To assess neurobehavioural effects of low exposure to lead, 43 workers from a lead smelter and 45 workers from a glass factory were evaluated with the World Health Organisation neurobehavioural core test battery (NCTB) in a cross sectional study. METHODS: The NCTB comprises a questionnaire and seven tests that measure simple reaction time, short-term memory (digit span, Benton), mood (profile of mood states), eye-hand coordination (Santa Ana pegboard, pursuit aiming II), and perceptual speed (digit-symbol). RESULTS: Smelter workers were employed on average for four years, and had a mean blood lead concentration of 2.0 mumol/l (42 micrograms/dl). Glass factory workers had a mean of 0.72 mumol/l (15 micrograms/dl). Historical blood lead concentrations were used to classify exposure based on current, peak, and time weighted average. Although the exposed workers performed less well than the non-exposed in 10 of 14 response variables, only profile of mood states tension-anxiety, hostility, and depression mood scales showed a significantly poorer dose-response relation with blood lead concentration in multiple linear regression models that included age, education, and alcohol intake as covariates. The frequency of symptoms of anger, depression, fatigue, and joint pain were also significantly increased in the exposed group. CONCLUSION: This study is consistent with the larger body of neurobehavioural research of low occupational exposure to lead. The small effects found in this study occurred at blood lead concentrations slightly lower than those reported in several previous studies. SN - 1351-0711 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7627319/Neurobehavioural_evaluation_of_Venezuelan_workers_exposed_to_inorganic_lead_ L2 - https://oem.bmj.com/lookup/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=7627319 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -