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Comparisons of dietary intake and sources of fat in low- and high-fat diets of 18- to 24-year-olds.
J Am Diet Assoc 1995; 95(8):893-7JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the sources of fat in the diets of 18- to 24-year-olds and to identify the food group choices of those consuming 30% of energy or less from fat.

DESIGN

This study compared the fat intake, nutrient intake, and food group choices of young men and women consuming 30% or less or more than 30% of energy from fat.

SUBJECTS

The 1989-1991 Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by individuals (CSFII) provided the study sample of 1,062 (436 men and 626 women) 18- to 24-year-olds residing in the 48 coterminous states who completed one 24-hour food recall and two 1-day food records.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Dietary fat, vitamin, mineral, and food group intakes were determined by analysis of the 24-hour food recalls and the 1-day food records.

STATISTICAL ANALYSIS PERFORMED

Tests were used to detect differences in nutrient and food group intakes between the two groups for both men and women.

RESULTS

More than 75% of the sample consumed more than 30% of energy from fat. The men and women who consumed low-fat diets did so by choosing more low-fat dairy products, fruits, and grains. Men who consumed low-fat diets consumed significantly more alcohol than other men; women who consumed low-fat diets showed a similar trend although the difference was not statistically significant. Although men and women who consumed a high-fat diet did consume significantly greater amounts of fat and cholesterol, they also fared better in vitamin and mineral intake.

CONCLUSIONS

A minority of young adults consumed 30% or less of energy from fat. Compared with those who consumed more than 30% of energy from fat, men consumed significantly greater mean amounts of vitamin C and folate, and women consumed significantly greater mean amounts of vitamin A and folate. Young adults who consumed more than 30% of energy from fat exceeded current recommendations for dietary fat intake; however, the men were less likely to be at risk for calcium deficiency and the women were less likely to be at risk for vitamin E and zinc deficiencies. Because excess dietary fat and alcohol can lead to chronic disease, dietitians should continue to educate people about the relationship between nutrition and health.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutritional Science and Dietetics, University of Nebraska, Lincoln 68583-1584, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7636080

Citation

Hampl, J S., and N M. Betts. "Comparisons of Dietary Intake and Sources of Fat in Low- and High-fat Diets of 18- to 24-year-olds." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 95, no. 8, 1995, pp. 893-7.
Hampl JS, Betts NM. Comparisons of dietary intake and sources of fat in low- and high-fat diets of 18- to 24-year-olds. J Am Diet Assoc. 1995;95(8):893-7.
Hampl, J. S., & Betts, N. M. (1995). Comparisons of dietary intake and sources of fat in low- and high-fat diets of 18- to 24-year-olds. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 95(8), pp. 893-7.
Hampl JS, Betts NM. Comparisons of Dietary Intake and Sources of Fat in Low- and High-fat Diets of 18- to 24-year-olds. J Am Diet Assoc. 1995;95(8):893-7. PubMed PMID: 7636080.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Comparisons of dietary intake and sources of fat in low- and high-fat diets of 18- to 24-year-olds. AU - Hampl,J S, AU - Betts,N M, PY - 1995/8/1/pubmed PY - 1995/8/1/medline PY - 1995/8/1/entrez SP - 893 EP - 7 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 95 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine the sources of fat in the diets of 18- to 24-year-olds and to identify the food group choices of those consuming 30% of energy or less from fat. DESIGN: This study compared the fat intake, nutrient intake, and food group choices of young men and women consuming 30% or less or more than 30% of energy from fat. SUBJECTS: The 1989-1991 Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by individuals (CSFII) provided the study sample of 1,062 (436 men and 626 women) 18- to 24-year-olds residing in the 48 coterminous states who completed one 24-hour food recall and two 1-day food records. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Dietary fat, vitamin, mineral, and food group intakes were determined by analysis of the 24-hour food recalls and the 1-day food records. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS PERFORMED: Tests were used to detect differences in nutrient and food group intakes between the two groups for both men and women. RESULTS: More than 75% of the sample consumed more than 30% of energy from fat. The men and women who consumed low-fat diets did so by choosing more low-fat dairy products, fruits, and grains. Men who consumed low-fat diets consumed significantly more alcohol than other men; women who consumed low-fat diets showed a similar trend although the difference was not statistically significant. Although men and women who consumed a high-fat diet did consume significantly greater amounts of fat and cholesterol, they also fared better in vitamin and mineral intake. CONCLUSIONS: A minority of young adults consumed 30% or less of energy from fat. Compared with those who consumed more than 30% of energy from fat, men consumed significantly greater mean amounts of vitamin C and folate, and women consumed significantly greater mean amounts of vitamin A and folate. Young adults who consumed more than 30% of energy from fat exceeded current recommendations for dietary fat intake; however, the men were less likely to be at risk for calcium deficiency and the women were less likely to be at risk for vitamin E and zinc deficiencies. Because excess dietary fat and alcohol can lead to chronic disease, dietitians should continue to educate people about the relationship between nutrition and health. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7636080/Comparisons_of_dietary_intake_and_sources_of_fat_in_low__and_high_fat_diets_of_18__to_24_year_olds_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-8223(95)00247-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -