Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Misclassification in a questionnaire survey of varicose veins.
J Clin Epidemiol. 1995 Sep; 48(9):1175-8.JC

Abstract

The objective of this study was to assess the determinants and the effect of misclassification in a questionnaire survey of varicose veins. A random sample of 166 individuals aged 50 years in a larger prevalence study (n = 6874) was examined by a surgeon to validate the self-reporting of varicose veins. Varicose veins were assessed by a mailed questionnaire completed by the study subjects themselves and validated in a clinical examination by a surgeon. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, kappa coefficient, and Chamberlain indices of the self-assessed diagnosis in reference to the diagnosis by surgeon were estimated overall and in categories of determinants. The overall sensitivity and specificity estimates were 0.92 and 0.93, respectively. The specificity appeared to be poorer among subjects who reported positive family history of varicose veins (0.83) than among those with negative family history (0.98). With respect to some other determinants of varicose veins such as gender, height and weight, occupational status and position at work, there was at best weak but nevertheless inconclusive evidence on possible differential misclassification. Sensitivity appeared to be relatively good for epidemiologic purposes but one could have hoped for better specificity. The correction for misclassification resulted in estimated prevalence of 19% (uncorrected 24%) in men and 43% (uncorrected 45%) in women. A questionnaire survey of varicose veins showed a relatively good validity. The effect of misclassification in the total 5-year-old study population was small in women but moderately large in men. Familial predisposition to varicosis was associated with a lower accuracy of self-assessed diagnosis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Surgery, Tampere University Hospital, Finland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7636520

Citation

Laurikka, J, et al. "Misclassification in a Questionnaire Survey of Varicose Veins." Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, vol. 48, no. 9, 1995, pp. 1175-8.
Laurikka J, Läärä E, Sisto T, et al. Misclassification in a questionnaire survey of varicose veins. J Clin Epidemiol. 1995;48(9):1175-8.
Laurikka, J., Läärä, E., Sisto, T., Tarkka, M., Auvinen, O., & Hakama, M. (1995). Misclassification in a questionnaire survey of varicose veins. Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 48(9), 1175-8.
Laurikka J, et al. Misclassification in a Questionnaire Survey of Varicose Veins. J Clin Epidemiol. 1995;48(9):1175-8. PubMed PMID: 7636520.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Misclassification in a questionnaire survey of varicose veins. AU - Laurikka,J, AU - Läärä,E, AU - Sisto,T, AU - Tarkka,M, AU - Auvinen,O, AU - Hakama,M, PY - 1995/9/1/pubmed PY - 1995/9/1/medline PY - 1995/9/1/entrez SP - 1175 EP - 8 JF - Journal of clinical epidemiology JO - J Clin Epidemiol VL - 48 IS - 9 N2 - The objective of this study was to assess the determinants and the effect of misclassification in a questionnaire survey of varicose veins. A random sample of 166 individuals aged 50 years in a larger prevalence study (n = 6874) was examined by a surgeon to validate the self-reporting of varicose veins. Varicose veins were assessed by a mailed questionnaire completed by the study subjects themselves and validated in a clinical examination by a surgeon. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, kappa coefficient, and Chamberlain indices of the self-assessed diagnosis in reference to the diagnosis by surgeon were estimated overall and in categories of determinants. The overall sensitivity and specificity estimates were 0.92 and 0.93, respectively. The specificity appeared to be poorer among subjects who reported positive family history of varicose veins (0.83) than among those with negative family history (0.98). With respect to some other determinants of varicose veins such as gender, height and weight, occupational status and position at work, there was at best weak but nevertheless inconclusive evidence on possible differential misclassification. Sensitivity appeared to be relatively good for epidemiologic purposes but one could have hoped for better specificity. The correction for misclassification resulted in estimated prevalence of 19% (uncorrected 24%) in men and 43% (uncorrected 45%) in women. A questionnaire survey of varicose veins showed a relatively good validity. The effect of misclassification in the total 5-year-old study population was small in women but moderately large in men. Familial predisposition to varicosis was associated with a lower accuracy of self-assessed diagnosis. SN - 0895-4356 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7636520/Misclassification_in_a_questionnaire_survey_of_varicose_veins_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/0895-4356(95)00012-S DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -