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Analysis of hospital records in four African countries, 1975-1990, with emphasis on infectious diseases.
J Trop Med Hyg. 1995 Aug; 98(4):217-27.JT

Abstract

Detailed standardized annual reports are analysed for 17 rural hospitals in four African countries, with admission figures of 1.2 million patients (excluding deliveries) and more than 67,000 deaths over a period of 16 years. The countries involved are Zambia, Tanzania, Kenya and Ghana. Figures on admission, causes of death and clinical case fatality rates are presented per country and per 4-year calendar period for the most important infectious diseases. The number of admissions increased substantially in 3 of the 4 countries (50-77%) between 1976 and 1990, but admission rates (per 1,000 population per year) by much less (6-25%), indicating that a large part of the increase in the volume of services was due to population growth. The number of infectious disease admissions in Ghana, however, decreased by 12% and even more in terms of admission rates (by 42%). About 75% of all admissions in children below 15 years of age were due to infections and infection related diseases; for adults this figure was 31%. Malaria is the single most important infectious disease both in terms of admissions and as a cause of death; it has increased substantially in three of the four countries. Bacterial infections, in particular pneumonia, gastroenteritis, meningitis and tuberculosis, are also important diseases in terms of admissions and deaths. On the whole they have remained at more or less the same level in 1975-1990 in terms of both admissions and deaths. Immunizable diseases and measles, once important as causes of admissions and deaths, have declined in all countries. Case fatality rates vary substantially by type of disease. They are very high for tetanus (36.7-68.8%) and meningitis (14.7-43%), and low for malaria (0.6-4.6%). However, they vary considerably in the four countries included in the study and are usually lower in children than in adults. A need for detailed studies with good "standardized" hospital records is emphasized. Representative data are needed from all hospitals in a given catchment area, with defined diagnoses for diseases and details regarding age and sex. This kind of information is highly desirable for planning and operation of curative and preventive medical care in developing countries.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Microbiology, Schieland Hospital, Schiedam, The Netherlands.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7636917

Citation

Petit, P L., and J K. van Ginneken. "Analysis of Hospital Records in Four African Countries, 1975-1990, With Emphasis On Infectious Diseases." The Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 98, no. 4, 1995, pp. 217-27.
Petit PL, van Ginneken JK. Analysis of hospital records in four African countries, 1975-1990, with emphasis on infectious diseases. J Trop Med Hyg. 1995;98(4):217-27.
Petit, P. L., & van Ginneken, J. K. (1995). Analysis of hospital records in four African countries, 1975-1990, with emphasis on infectious diseases. The Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 98(4), 217-27.
Petit PL, van Ginneken JK. Analysis of Hospital Records in Four African Countries, 1975-1990, With Emphasis On Infectious Diseases. J Trop Med Hyg. 1995;98(4):217-27. PubMed PMID: 7636917.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Analysis of hospital records in four African countries, 1975-1990, with emphasis on infectious diseases. AU - Petit,P L, AU - van Ginneken,J K, PY - 1995/8/1/pubmed PY - 1995/8/1/medline PY - 1995/8/1/entrez KW - Africa KW - Africa South Of The Sahara KW - Case Fatality Rate KW - Death Rate KW - Delivery Of Health Care KW - Demographic Factors KW - Developing Countries KW - Diseases KW - Eastern Africa KW - English Speaking Africa KW - Ghana KW - Health KW - Health Facilities KW - Hospitals KW - Infections KW - Information KW - Information Processing KW - Kenya KW - Malaria KW - Mortality KW - Organization And Administration KW - Parasitic Diseases KW - Planning KW - Population KW - Population Dynamics KW - Records KW - Research Report KW - Tanzania KW - Western Africa KW - Zambia SP - 217 EP - 27 JF - The Journal of tropical medicine and hygiene JO - J Trop Med Hyg VL - 98 IS - 4 N2 - Detailed standardized annual reports are analysed for 17 rural hospitals in four African countries, with admission figures of 1.2 million patients (excluding deliveries) and more than 67,000 deaths over a period of 16 years. The countries involved are Zambia, Tanzania, Kenya and Ghana. Figures on admission, causes of death and clinical case fatality rates are presented per country and per 4-year calendar period for the most important infectious diseases. The number of admissions increased substantially in 3 of the 4 countries (50-77%) between 1976 and 1990, but admission rates (per 1,000 population per year) by much less (6-25%), indicating that a large part of the increase in the volume of services was due to population growth. The number of infectious disease admissions in Ghana, however, decreased by 12% and even more in terms of admission rates (by 42%). About 75% of all admissions in children below 15 years of age were due to infections and infection related diseases; for adults this figure was 31%. Malaria is the single most important infectious disease both in terms of admissions and as a cause of death; it has increased substantially in three of the four countries. Bacterial infections, in particular pneumonia, gastroenteritis, meningitis and tuberculosis, are also important diseases in terms of admissions and deaths. On the whole they have remained at more or less the same level in 1975-1990 in terms of both admissions and deaths. Immunizable diseases and measles, once important as causes of admissions and deaths, have declined in all countries. Case fatality rates vary substantially by type of disease. They are very high for tetanus (36.7-68.8%) and meningitis (14.7-43%), and low for malaria (0.6-4.6%). However, they vary considerably in the four countries included in the study and are usually lower in children than in adults. A need for detailed studies with good "standardized" hospital records is emphasized. Representative data are needed from all hospitals in a given catchment area, with defined diagnoses for diseases and details regarding age and sex. This kind of information is highly desirable for planning and operation of curative and preventive medical care in developing countries. SN - 0022-5304 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7636917/Analysis_of_hospital_records_in_four_African_countries_1975_1990_with_emphasis_on_infectious_diseases_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/infectiousdiseases.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -