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Influence of spontaneous calcium intake and physical exercise on the vertebral and femoral bone mineral density of children and adolescents.
J Bone Miner Res. 1995 May; 10(5):675-82.JB

Abstract

Peak bone mass is determined mainly by genetic-ethnic factors, but environmental factors such as calcium intake and physical activity during childhood and adolescence could play a role. We have measured the bone mineral density (BMD) of 151 healthy children and adolescents, ages 7-15.3 years. Density was measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) at two sites (lumbar verterbrae L1-L4 and the upper femur), and the data were analyzed in terms of the height, weight, sexual maturation, spontaneous calcium intake, and physical activity. Of the children, 57-71% had calcium intakes below 1000 mg/day. BMD increased with pubertal maturation from 0.68 +/- 0.08 to 0.92 +/- 0.09 g/cm2 (vertebral bone density, VBD) and from 0.87 +/- 0.10 to 1.03 +/- 0.09 g/cm2 (femoral bone density, FBD) between Tanner stage 1 and 5. Multiple regression analysis showed that body weight and Tanner stage were main determinants of bone density when expressed as g/cm2. The weekly duration of sports activity also influenced both the vertebral (p < 0.001) and femoral (p = 0.01) sites, especially in girls and during puberty. Dietary calcium appeared to be another independent determinant of BMD, especially before puberty, at the vertebral (p = 0.02) site. Most important, dietary calcium was found to be the main determinant of vertebral mineral density, when expressed as z score, in both sexes. Moreover, 93% of the 28 children with low vertebral z score values (below -1) and 84% of the 31 children with low femoral z score values (below -1) had dietary calcium intakes below 1000 mg/day.

Authors+Show Affiliations

ACCA, Hôpital Cochin, Paris, France.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7639101

Citation

Ruiz, J C., et al. "Influence of Spontaneous Calcium Intake and Physical Exercise On the Vertebral and Femoral Bone Mineral Density of Children and Adolescents." Journal of Bone and Mineral Research : the Official Journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research, vol. 10, no. 5, 1995, pp. 675-82.
Ruiz JC, Mandel C, Garabedian M. Influence of spontaneous calcium intake and physical exercise on the vertebral and femoral bone mineral density of children and adolescents. J Bone Miner Res. 1995;10(5):675-82.
Ruiz, J. C., Mandel, C., & Garabedian, M. (1995). Influence of spontaneous calcium intake and physical exercise on the vertebral and femoral bone mineral density of children and adolescents. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research : the Official Journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research, 10(5), 675-82.
Ruiz JC, Mandel C, Garabedian M. Influence of Spontaneous Calcium Intake and Physical Exercise On the Vertebral and Femoral Bone Mineral Density of Children and Adolescents. J Bone Miner Res. 1995;10(5):675-82. PubMed PMID: 7639101.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Influence of spontaneous calcium intake and physical exercise on the vertebral and femoral bone mineral density of children and adolescents. AU - Ruiz,J C, AU - Mandel,C, AU - Garabedian,M, PY - 1995/5/1/pubmed PY - 1995/5/1/medline PY - 1995/5/1/entrez SP - 675 EP - 82 JF - Journal of bone and mineral research : the official journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research JO - J. Bone Miner. Res. VL - 10 IS - 5 N2 - Peak bone mass is determined mainly by genetic-ethnic factors, but environmental factors such as calcium intake and physical activity during childhood and adolescence could play a role. We have measured the bone mineral density (BMD) of 151 healthy children and adolescents, ages 7-15.3 years. Density was measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) at two sites (lumbar verterbrae L1-L4 and the upper femur), and the data were analyzed in terms of the height, weight, sexual maturation, spontaneous calcium intake, and physical activity. Of the children, 57-71% had calcium intakes below 1000 mg/day. BMD increased with pubertal maturation from 0.68 +/- 0.08 to 0.92 +/- 0.09 g/cm2 (vertebral bone density, VBD) and from 0.87 +/- 0.10 to 1.03 +/- 0.09 g/cm2 (femoral bone density, FBD) between Tanner stage 1 and 5. Multiple regression analysis showed that body weight and Tanner stage were main determinants of bone density when expressed as g/cm2. The weekly duration of sports activity also influenced both the vertebral (p < 0.001) and femoral (p = 0.01) sites, especially in girls and during puberty. Dietary calcium appeared to be another independent determinant of BMD, especially before puberty, at the vertebral (p = 0.02) site. Most important, dietary calcium was found to be the main determinant of vertebral mineral density, when expressed as z score, in both sexes. Moreover, 93% of the 28 children with low vertebral z score values (below -1) and 84% of the 31 children with low femoral z score values (below -1) had dietary calcium intakes below 1000 mg/day. SN - 0884-0431 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7639101/Influence_of_spontaneous_calcium_intake_and_physical_exercise_on_the_vertebral_and_femoral_bone_mineral_density_of_children_and_adolescents_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/jbmr.5650100502 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -