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Validity of urine-blood hydrational measures to assess total body water changes during mountaineering in the sub-Arctic.
Arctic Med Res 1995; 54(2):69-77AM

Abstract

Mountaineering involves high altitude and cold exposure which are each associated with significant levels of dehydration (via altitude-cold diuresis, high energy expenditures, and poor access to water). The purpose of this study was to identify and validate urine and blood indices of dehydration as compared to changes in total body water (which served as the reference standard). Male subjects (n = 10) were studied during a 14 day mountaineering expedition in the sub-Arctic during which they climbed to an altitude of 5245 +/- 229 m (mean +/- SE). Daily activity consisted of approximately 10-15 hours skiing, hiking, and performing mountaineering tasks with heavy loads (> 30 kg). Various measurements were made immediately before ascending (Pre) and after descending (Post) the mountain: body weight (Bw) and composition (%Fat), urine specific gravity (USG), urine protein (UP), plasma electrolytes (K+, Cl-, Na+), plasma proteins (PP), plasma and urinary osmolality (UOsm), hematocrit (Hct), hemoglobin (Hb), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), plasma aldosterone, and total body water (TBW determined via deuterium oxide). Post the expedition significant (p < 0.05) decreases were observed in Bw, and %Fat, while significant increases were found in Na+, K+, USG, UOsm and UP. TBW was slightly reduced, however, changes were non-significant (Pre = 52.9 +/- 1.2 L vs. Post = 52.6 +/- 1.3 L). USG is often used to monitor hydration status in field settings; however, no significant correlations were found between changes in TBW and USG, nor between changes in TBW and other typical urinary indicators of dehydration.(

ABSTRACT

TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Authors+Show Affiliations

Applied Physiology Laboratory, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7639888

Citation

Hackney, A C., et al. "Validity of Urine-blood Hydrational Measures to Assess Total Body Water Changes During Mountaineering in the Sub-Arctic." Arctic Medical Research, vol. 54, no. 2, 1995, pp. 69-77.
Hackney AC, Coyne JT, Pozos R, et al. Validity of urine-blood hydrational measures to assess total body water changes during mountaineering in the sub-Arctic. Arctic Med Res. 1995;54(2):69-77.
Hackney, A. C., Coyne, J. T., Pozos, R., Feith, S., & Seale, J. (1995). Validity of urine-blood hydrational measures to assess total body water changes during mountaineering in the sub-Arctic. Arctic Medical Research, 54(2), pp. 69-77.
Hackney AC, et al. Validity of Urine-blood Hydrational Measures to Assess Total Body Water Changes During Mountaineering in the Sub-Arctic. Arctic Med Res. 1995;54(2):69-77. PubMed PMID: 7639888.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Validity of urine-blood hydrational measures to assess total body water changes during mountaineering in the sub-Arctic. AU - Hackney,A C, AU - Coyne,J T, AU - Pozos,R, AU - Feith,S, AU - Seale,J, PY - 1995/4/1/pubmed PY - 1995/4/1/medline PY - 1995/4/1/entrez SP - 69 EP - 77 JF - Arctic medical research JO - Arctic Med Res VL - 54 IS - 2 N2 - Mountaineering involves high altitude and cold exposure which are each associated with significant levels of dehydration (via altitude-cold diuresis, high energy expenditures, and poor access to water). The purpose of this study was to identify and validate urine and blood indices of dehydration as compared to changes in total body water (which served as the reference standard). Male subjects (n = 10) were studied during a 14 day mountaineering expedition in the sub-Arctic during which they climbed to an altitude of 5245 +/- 229 m (mean +/- SE). Daily activity consisted of approximately 10-15 hours skiing, hiking, and performing mountaineering tasks with heavy loads (> 30 kg). Various measurements were made immediately before ascending (Pre) and after descending (Post) the mountain: body weight (Bw) and composition (%Fat), urine specific gravity (USG), urine protein (UP), plasma electrolytes (K+, Cl-, Na+), plasma proteins (PP), plasma and urinary osmolality (UOsm), hematocrit (Hct), hemoglobin (Hb), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), plasma aldosterone, and total body water (TBW determined via deuterium oxide). Post the expedition significant (p < 0.05) decreases were observed in Bw, and %Fat, while significant increases were found in Na+, K+, USG, UOsm and UP. TBW was slightly reduced, however, changes were non-significant (Pre = 52.9 +/- 1.2 L vs. Post = 52.6 +/- 1.3 L). USG is often used to monitor hydration status in field settings; however, no significant correlations were found between changes in TBW and USG, nor between changes in TBW and other typical urinary indicators of dehydration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) SN - 0782-226X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7639888/Validity_of_urine_blood_hydrational_measures_to_assess_total_body_water_changes_during_mountaineering_in_the_sub_Arctic_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/dehydration.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -