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Nonsurgical treatment options for internal hemorrhoids.
Am Fam Physician. 1995 Sep 01; 52(3):821-34, 839-41.AF

Abstract

Rectal pain and/or bleeding are common complaints among the general population. Hemorrhoids are the most common etiology for these complaints, but the family physician should always be alert to the possibility of other pathologic explanations, such as fissure, abscess, fistula, condyloma or cancer. Feelings of embarrassment or apprehension about surgery may make patients reluctant to discuss anorectal symptoms with their physician. A variety of outpatient methods is available to treat internal hemorrhoids. Rubber band ligation is widely used in the treatment of all grades of internal hemorrhoids. Infrared coagulation uses high-intensity light to treat grade I, grade II and some grade III internal hemorrhoids. Bipolar electrocoagulation is useful in all cases, while low-voltage direct current is useful in cases of more advanced hemorrhoids. Proper anal hygiene and correction of chronic constipation or diarrhea are essential to prevent recurrence of hemorrhoids.

Authors+Show Affiliations

National Procedures Institute, Midland, Michigan, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7653423

Citation

Pfenninger, J L., and J Surrell. "Nonsurgical Treatment Options for Internal Hemorrhoids." American Family Physician, vol. 52, no. 3, 1995, pp. 821-34, 839-41.
Pfenninger JL, Surrell J. Nonsurgical treatment options for internal hemorrhoids. Am Fam Physician. 1995;52(3):821-34, 839-41.
Pfenninger, J. L., & Surrell, J. (1995). Nonsurgical treatment options for internal hemorrhoids. American Family Physician, 52(3), 821-34, 839-41.
Pfenninger JL, Surrell J. Nonsurgical Treatment Options for Internal Hemorrhoids. Am Fam Physician. 1995 Sep 1;52(3):821-34, 839-41. PubMed PMID: 7653423.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Nonsurgical treatment options for internal hemorrhoids. AU - Pfenninger,J L, AU - Surrell,J, PY - 1995/9/1/pubmed PY - 1995/9/1/medline PY - 1995/9/1/entrez SP - 821-34, 839-41 JF - American family physician JO - Am Fam Physician VL - 52 IS - 3 N2 - Rectal pain and/or bleeding are common complaints among the general population. Hemorrhoids are the most common etiology for these complaints, but the family physician should always be alert to the possibility of other pathologic explanations, such as fissure, abscess, fistula, condyloma or cancer. Feelings of embarrassment or apprehension about surgery may make patients reluctant to discuss anorectal symptoms with their physician. A variety of outpatient methods is available to treat internal hemorrhoids. Rubber band ligation is widely used in the treatment of all grades of internal hemorrhoids. Infrared coagulation uses high-intensity light to treat grade I, grade II and some grade III internal hemorrhoids. Bipolar electrocoagulation is useful in all cases, while low-voltage direct current is useful in cases of more advanced hemorrhoids. Proper anal hygiene and correction of chronic constipation or diarrhea are essential to prevent recurrence of hemorrhoids. SN - 0002-838X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7653423/Nonsurgical_treatment_options_for_internal_hemorrhoids_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/hemorrhoids.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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