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Outbreaks of foodborne infectious intestinal disease in England and Wales: 1992 and 1993.
Commun Dis Rep CDR Rev. 1995 Jul 21; 5(8):R109-17.CD

Abstract

We have analysed data from the surveillance scheme of general foodborne outbreaks of infectious intestinal disease in England and Wales reported to, or otherwise identified by, the PHLS Communicable Disease Surveillance Centre in 1992 and 1993. Data were available about 458 outbreaks, 197 (43%) in commercial catering premises (restaurants, cafés, hotels, public houses, and canteens), 77 (17%) associated with food prepared in private houses, and 58 (13%) in hospitals and residential institutions. Salmonellas and Clostridium perfringens were responsible for 340 outbreaks (74%) and no pathogen was identified in 55 outbreaks (12%). Organisms associated with the highest mean attack rates were Staphylococcus aureus (66%) and C. perfringens (53%). Eleven thousand people were reported to be il and 362 were admitted to hospital. There were 15 deaths, 13 of which were associated with salmonellosis. A specified food was suspected to be the vehicle of infection in 204 outbreaks (45%). Possible contributory factors were identified in 277 (61%), most commonly inappropriate storage, cross contamination, and inadequate heat treatment. Reducing the incidence of food poisoning will depend on concerted action on farms, in abattoirs and food processing plants, in wholesale and retail outlets, and in kitchens.

Authors

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Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7663603

Citation

Cowden, J M., et al. "Outbreaks of Foodborne Infectious Intestinal Disease in England and Wales: 1992 and 1993." Communicable Disease Report. CDR Review, vol. 5, no. 8, 1995, pp. R109-17.
Cowden JM, Wall PG, Adak G, et al. Outbreaks of foodborne infectious intestinal disease in England and Wales: 1992 and 1993. Commun Dis Rep CDR Rev. 1995;5(8):R109-17.
Cowden, J. M., Wall, P. G., Adak, G., Evans, H., Le Baigue, S., & Ross, D. (1995). Outbreaks of foodborne infectious intestinal disease in England and Wales: 1992 and 1993. Communicable Disease Report. CDR Review, 5(8), R109-17.
Cowden JM, et al. Outbreaks of Foodborne Infectious Intestinal Disease in England and Wales: 1992 and 1993. Commun Dis Rep CDR Rev. 1995 Jul 21;5(8):R109-17. PubMed PMID: 7663603.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Outbreaks of foodborne infectious intestinal disease in England and Wales: 1992 and 1993. AU - Cowden,J M, AU - Wall,P G, AU - Adak,G, AU - Evans,H, AU - Le Baigue,S, AU - Ross,D, PY - 1995/7/21/pubmed PY - 1995/7/21/medline PY - 1995/7/21/entrez SP - R109 EP - 17 JF - Communicable disease report. CDR review JO - Commun Dis Rep CDR Rev VL - 5 IS - 8 N2 - We have analysed data from the surveillance scheme of general foodborne outbreaks of infectious intestinal disease in England and Wales reported to, or otherwise identified by, the PHLS Communicable Disease Surveillance Centre in 1992 and 1993. Data were available about 458 outbreaks, 197 (43%) in commercial catering premises (restaurants, cafés, hotels, public houses, and canteens), 77 (17%) associated with food prepared in private houses, and 58 (13%) in hospitals and residential institutions. Salmonellas and Clostridium perfringens were responsible for 340 outbreaks (74%) and no pathogen was identified in 55 outbreaks (12%). Organisms associated with the highest mean attack rates were Staphylococcus aureus (66%) and C. perfringens (53%). Eleven thousand people were reported to be il and 362 were admitted to hospital. There were 15 deaths, 13 of which were associated with salmonellosis. A specified food was suspected to be the vehicle of infection in 204 outbreaks (45%). Possible contributory factors were identified in 277 (61%), most commonly inappropriate storage, cross contamination, and inadequate heat treatment. Reducing the incidence of food poisoning will depend on concerted action on farms, in abattoirs and food processing plants, in wholesale and retail outlets, and in kitchens. SN - 1350-9349 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7663603/Outbreaks_of_foodborne_infectious_intestinal_disease_in_England_and_Wales:_1992_and_1993_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/foodborneillness.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -