Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Sunscreen protection of contact hypersensitivity responses from chronic solar-simulated ultraviolet irradiation correlates with the absorption spectrum of the sunscreen.
J Invest Dermatol. 1995 Sep; 105(3):345-51.JI

Abstract

This study compares the ability of two ultraviolet (UV) B-absorbing sunscreens, 2-ethylhexyl p-methoxycinnamate (2-EHMC) and 2-ethylhexyl p-aminobenzoate (Padimate O), and two physical sunscreens, microfine titanium dioxide (MTD) and zinc oxide, to protect the skin immune system from chronic (4 weeks) solar-simulated UV irradiation. Mice were exposed to suberythemal doses of UV before assessing local and systemic immunosuppression and tolerance to a contact sensitizer. Using a UV protocol that induced local but not systemic immunosuppression or tolerance in BALB/c mice, it was shown that Padimate O made the immunosuppression worse, whereas 2-EHMC and MTD protected the immune system. When the cumulative dose was increased by 12.7%, causing systemic immunosuppression and tolerance, none of the sunscreens protected from immunosuppression, but 2-EHMC provided partial, and MTD gave complete protection from tolerance. To examine this apparent lack of protection from systemic immunosuppression, C3H/HeJ mice were used. These mice had a minimal erythema dose similar to that of the BALB/c mice but were systemically immunosuppressed, with only 44% of the UV dose required to immunosuppress BALB/c mice. 2-EHMC provided some protection, whereas MTD provided complete protection from systemic immunosuppression in C3H/HeJ mice. Hence, sunscreens can protect from local and systemic immunosuppression, although this protection is limited and is not related to the sun protection factor of the sunscreens or the minimal erythema dose of the mouse strain. Instead, protection seems to be related to the sunscreens' having a broad absorption spectrum.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine (Dermatology), University of Sydney, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7665910

Citation

Bestak, R, et al. "Sunscreen Protection of Contact Hypersensitivity Responses From Chronic Solar-simulated Ultraviolet Irradiation Correlates With the Absorption Spectrum of the Sunscreen." The Journal of Investigative Dermatology, vol. 105, no. 3, 1995, pp. 345-51.
Bestak R, Barnetson RS, Nearn MR, et al. Sunscreen protection of contact hypersensitivity responses from chronic solar-simulated ultraviolet irradiation correlates with the absorption spectrum of the sunscreen. J Invest Dermatol. 1995;105(3):345-51.
Bestak, R., Barnetson, R. S., Nearn, M. R., & Halliday, G. M. (1995). Sunscreen protection of contact hypersensitivity responses from chronic solar-simulated ultraviolet irradiation correlates with the absorption spectrum of the sunscreen. The Journal of Investigative Dermatology, 105(3), 345-51.
Bestak R, et al. Sunscreen Protection of Contact Hypersensitivity Responses From Chronic Solar-simulated Ultraviolet Irradiation Correlates With the Absorption Spectrum of the Sunscreen. J Invest Dermatol. 1995;105(3):345-51. PubMed PMID: 7665910.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sunscreen protection of contact hypersensitivity responses from chronic solar-simulated ultraviolet irradiation correlates with the absorption spectrum of the sunscreen. AU - Bestak,R, AU - Barnetson,R S, AU - Nearn,M R, AU - Halliday,G M, PY - 1995/9/1/pubmed PY - 1995/9/1/medline PY - 1995/9/1/entrez SP - 345 EP - 51 JF - The Journal of investigative dermatology JO - J Invest Dermatol VL - 105 IS - 3 N2 - This study compares the ability of two ultraviolet (UV) B-absorbing sunscreens, 2-ethylhexyl p-methoxycinnamate (2-EHMC) and 2-ethylhexyl p-aminobenzoate (Padimate O), and two physical sunscreens, microfine titanium dioxide (MTD) and zinc oxide, to protect the skin immune system from chronic (4 weeks) solar-simulated UV irradiation. Mice were exposed to suberythemal doses of UV before assessing local and systemic immunosuppression and tolerance to a contact sensitizer. Using a UV protocol that induced local but not systemic immunosuppression or tolerance in BALB/c mice, it was shown that Padimate O made the immunosuppression worse, whereas 2-EHMC and MTD protected the immune system. When the cumulative dose was increased by 12.7%, causing systemic immunosuppression and tolerance, none of the sunscreens protected from immunosuppression, but 2-EHMC provided partial, and MTD gave complete protection from tolerance. To examine this apparent lack of protection from systemic immunosuppression, C3H/HeJ mice were used. These mice had a minimal erythema dose similar to that of the BALB/c mice but were systemically immunosuppressed, with only 44% of the UV dose required to immunosuppress BALB/c mice. 2-EHMC provided some protection, whereas MTD provided complete protection from systemic immunosuppression in C3H/HeJ mice. Hence, sunscreens can protect from local and systemic immunosuppression, although this protection is limited and is not related to the sun protection factor of the sunscreens or the minimal erythema dose of the mouse strain. Instead, protection seems to be related to the sunscreens' having a broad absorption spectrum. SN - 0022-202X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7665910/Sunscreen_protection_of_contact_hypersensitivity_responses_from_chronic_solar_simulated_ultraviolet_irradiation_correlates_with_the_absorption_spectrum_of_the_sunscreen_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-202X(15)42304-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -