Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

A comparison of diets with and without oats in adults with celiac disease.
N Engl J Med 1995; 333(16):1033-7NEJM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Wheat, rye, and barley damage the small-intestinal mucosa of patients with celiac disease; maize and rice are harmless. The effects of a diet containing oats are uncertain.

METHODS

In a randomized trial, we compared the effects of gluten-free diets without oats and with oats (with a goal of 50 to 70 g per day from three sources: two types of wheat-starch flour mixed with an equal amount of oats, muesli containing 60 percent oats, and rolled-oat breakfast cereal). Fifty-two adults with celiac disease in remission were followed for 6 months and 40 with newly diagnosed disease for 12 months. Endoscopy with duodenal biopsy was performed at the beginning and end of the study.

RESULTS

The mean (+/- SD) oat intake in the oat group was 49.9 +/- 14.7 g per day at 6 months for patients in remission and 46.6 +/- 13.3 g per day at 12 months for patients with newly diagnosed disease. The oat and control groups did not differ significantly in nutritional status, symptoms, or laboratory measures. Patients in remission, regardless of diet, did not have worsening architecture of the duodenal villi or increased mononuclear-cell infiltration. All the patients with new diagnoses were in remission at one year, except for one in the control group. Six patients in the oat groups and five in the control group withdrew from the study.

CONCLUSIONS

Moderate amounts of oats can be included in a gluten-free diet for most adult patients with celiac disease without adverse effects.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Kuopio University Hospital, Finland.

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7675045

Citation

Janatuinen, E K., et al. "A Comparison of Diets With and Without Oats in Adults With Celiac Disease." The New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 333, no. 16, 1995, pp. 1033-7.
Janatuinen EK, Pikkarainen PH, Kemppainen TA, et al. A comparison of diets with and without oats in adults with celiac disease. N Engl J Med. 1995;333(16):1033-7.
Janatuinen, E. K., Pikkarainen, P. H., Kemppainen, T. A., Kosma, V. M., Järvinen, R. M., Uusitupa, M. I., & Julkunen, R. J. (1995). A comparison of diets with and without oats in adults with celiac disease. The New England Journal of Medicine, 333(16), pp. 1033-7.
Janatuinen EK, et al. A Comparison of Diets With and Without Oats in Adults With Celiac Disease. N Engl J Med. 1995 Oct 19;333(16):1033-7. PubMed PMID: 7675045.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A comparison of diets with and without oats in adults with celiac disease. AU - Janatuinen,E K, AU - Pikkarainen,P H, AU - Kemppainen,T A, AU - Kosma,V M, AU - Järvinen,R M, AU - Uusitupa,M I, AU - Julkunen,R J, PY - 1995/10/19/pubmed PY - 1995/10/19/medline PY - 1995/10/19/entrez SP - 1033 EP - 7 JF - The New England journal of medicine JO - N. Engl. J. Med. VL - 333 IS - 16 N2 - BACKGROUND: Wheat, rye, and barley damage the small-intestinal mucosa of patients with celiac disease; maize and rice are harmless. The effects of a diet containing oats are uncertain. METHODS: In a randomized trial, we compared the effects of gluten-free diets without oats and with oats (with a goal of 50 to 70 g per day from three sources: two types of wheat-starch flour mixed with an equal amount of oats, muesli containing 60 percent oats, and rolled-oat breakfast cereal). Fifty-two adults with celiac disease in remission were followed for 6 months and 40 with newly diagnosed disease for 12 months. Endoscopy with duodenal biopsy was performed at the beginning and end of the study. RESULTS: The mean (+/- SD) oat intake in the oat group was 49.9 +/- 14.7 g per day at 6 months for patients in remission and 46.6 +/- 13.3 g per day at 12 months for patients with newly diagnosed disease. The oat and control groups did not differ significantly in nutritional status, symptoms, or laboratory measures. Patients in remission, regardless of diet, did not have worsening architecture of the duodenal villi or increased mononuclear-cell infiltration. All the patients with new diagnoses were in remission at one year, except for one in the control group. Six patients in the oat groups and five in the control group withdrew from the study. CONCLUSIONS: Moderate amounts of oats can be included in a gluten-free diet for most adult patients with celiac disease without adverse effects. SN - 0028-4793 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7675045/A_comparison_of_diets_with_and_without_oats_in_adults_with_celiac_disease_ L2 - http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJM199510193331602?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -