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Breast cancer early detection: differences between African American and white women's health beliefs and detection practices.
Oncol Nurs Forum. 1995 Jun; 22(5):835-7.ON

Abstract

PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES

To identify differences in African American and white women's health beliefs and practices regarding early detection of breast cancer.

DESIGN AND SETTING

Descriptive survey of educators employed by one public school system in one southern state.

SAMPLE

One hundred seventeen African American and 157 white female professional educators.

METHODS

Subjects completed a survey questionnaire consisting of investigator-developed items and an adapted version of Champion's Health Belief Model Scales.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Reported frequency of use of mammography, clinical breast examination (CBE), and breast self-examination (BSE); health beliefs about these procedures.

FINDINGS

No significant difference in frequency of use of mammography and CBE was found between the two groups. The difference for BSE frequency approached significance (p = 0.058); African American women had performed BSE significantly more times (p = 0.028) than white women during the preceding 12 months. White women had a significantly higher mean score (p = 0.002) for barriers to mammography. The difference between the two groups for barriers to CBE and control with CBE reached the 0.05 level of significance; in both cases, white women had the higher mean score. No significant difference was found in mean scores for beliefs about BSE.

CONCLUSIONS

The contribution of health beliefs about breast cancer, mammography, CBE, and BSE to frequency of use of these procedures by race remains unclear.

IMPLICATIONS

Efforts to inform women of the need to adopt an early breast cancer detection program should continue. Additional studies are needed to validate present study findings and to expand the knowledge base for healthcare providers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Troy State University School of Nursing, Phenix City, AL, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7675691

Citation

Douglass, M, et al. "Breast Cancer Early Detection: Differences Between African American and White Women's Health Beliefs and Detection Practices." Oncology Nursing Forum, vol. 22, no. 5, 1995, pp. 835-7.
Douglass M, Bartolucci A, Waterbor J, et al. Breast cancer early detection: differences between African American and white women's health beliefs and detection practices. Oncol Nurs Forum. 1995;22(5):835-7.
Douglass, M., Bartolucci, A., Waterbor, J., & Sirles, A. (1995). Breast cancer early detection: differences between African American and white women's health beliefs and detection practices. Oncology Nursing Forum, 22(5), 835-7.
Douglass M, et al. Breast Cancer Early Detection: Differences Between African American and White Women's Health Beliefs and Detection Practices. Oncol Nurs Forum. 1995;22(5):835-7. PubMed PMID: 7675691.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Breast cancer early detection: differences between African American and white women's health beliefs and detection practices. AU - Douglass,M, AU - Bartolucci,A, AU - Waterbor,J, AU - Sirles,A, PY - 1995/6/1/pubmed PY - 1995/6/1/medline PY - 1995/6/1/entrez SP - 835 EP - 7 JF - Oncology nursing forum JO - Oncol Nurs Forum VL - 22 IS - 5 N2 - PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To identify differences in African American and white women's health beliefs and practices regarding early detection of breast cancer. DESIGN AND SETTING: Descriptive survey of educators employed by one public school system in one southern state. SAMPLE: One hundred seventeen African American and 157 white female professional educators. METHODS: Subjects completed a survey questionnaire consisting of investigator-developed items and an adapted version of Champion's Health Belief Model Scales. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Reported frequency of use of mammography, clinical breast examination (CBE), and breast self-examination (BSE); health beliefs about these procedures. FINDINGS: No significant difference in frequency of use of mammography and CBE was found between the two groups. The difference for BSE frequency approached significance (p = 0.058); African American women had performed BSE significantly more times (p = 0.028) than white women during the preceding 12 months. White women had a significantly higher mean score (p = 0.002) for barriers to mammography. The difference between the two groups for barriers to CBE and control with CBE reached the 0.05 level of significance; in both cases, white women had the higher mean score. No significant difference was found in mean scores for beliefs about BSE. CONCLUSIONS: The contribution of health beliefs about breast cancer, mammography, CBE, and BSE to frequency of use of these procedures by race remains unclear. IMPLICATIONS: Efforts to inform women of the need to adopt an early breast cancer detection program should continue. Additional studies are needed to validate present study findings and to expand the knowledge base for healthcare providers. SN - 0190-535X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7675691/Breast_cancer_early_detection:_differences_between_African_American_and_white_women's_health_beliefs_and_detection_practices_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -