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Prevention of posttransfusion hepatitis B and C by screening for antibody to hepatitis C virus and antibody to HBcAg.
Hepatology 1993; 18(5):1045-9Hep

Abstract

Screening of blood donors by testing for antibody to HBcAg and antibody to hepatitis C virus is commonly done. However, the applicability of these screening tests may vary depending on the prevalence of hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus infection in various populations. We have therefore prospectively evaluated 158 adult patients who received blood or blood products during open-heart surgery in Hong Kong to compare the efficacy of various serological screening tests in the prevention of posttransfusion hepatitis. Serum from five (0.5%) donors was positive for antibody to hepatitis C virus by second-generation enzyme immunoassay; in two, optical-density readings in enzyme immunoassay were greater than 2.0, but only one was positive for hepatitis C virus RNA by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The latter donor was also positive for antibody to HBcAg and had elevated serum ALT activity. The recipient of a unit of this donor's blood was the only one in whom posttransfusion hepatitis C developed (0.1% per unit transfused). Screening with antibody to hepatitis C virus was more specific than that with antibody to HBcAg or ALT in excluding donors from transmitting hepatitis C (99.6%, 79.4% and 98.8%, respectively). Both the sensitivity and negative predictive value of screening for antibody to hepatitis C virus were 100%, but the positive predictive value was only 20%. Forty-five blood recipients were considered susceptible to hepatitis B virus infection because testing for hepatitis B serology in serum (HBsAg, antibody to HBsAg and antibody to HBcAg) was negative before being transfused. Asymptomatic hepatitis B seroconversion developed in three (6.7%) recipients (1.1% per unit transfused).(

ABSTRACT

TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, University of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7693569

Citation

Chung, H T., et al. "Prevention of Posttransfusion Hepatitis B and C By Screening for Antibody to Hepatitis C Virus and Antibody to HBcAg." Hepatology (Baltimore, Md.), vol. 18, no. 5, 1993, pp. 1045-9.
Chung HT, Lee JS, Lok AS. Prevention of posttransfusion hepatitis B and C by screening for antibody to hepatitis C virus and antibody to HBcAg. Hepatology. 1993;18(5):1045-9.
Chung, H. T., Lee, J. S., & Lok, A. S. (1993). Prevention of posttransfusion hepatitis B and C by screening for antibody to hepatitis C virus and antibody to HBcAg. Hepatology (Baltimore, Md.), 18(5), pp. 1045-9.
Chung HT, Lee JS, Lok AS. Prevention of Posttransfusion Hepatitis B and C By Screening for Antibody to Hepatitis C Virus and Antibody to HBcAg. Hepatology. 1993;18(5):1045-9. PubMed PMID: 7693569.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevention of posttransfusion hepatitis B and C by screening for antibody to hepatitis C virus and antibody to HBcAg. AU - Chung,H T, AU - Lee,J S, AU - Lok,A S, PY - 1993/11/1/pubmed PY - 1993/11/1/medline PY - 1993/11/1/entrez SP - 1045 EP - 9 JF - Hepatology (Baltimore, Md.) JO - Hepatology VL - 18 IS - 5 N2 - Screening of blood donors by testing for antibody to HBcAg and antibody to hepatitis C virus is commonly done. However, the applicability of these screening tests may vary depending on the prevalence of hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus infection in various populations. We have therefore prospectively evaluated 158 adult patients who received blood or blood products during open-heart surgery in Hong Kong to compare the efficacy of various serological screening tests in the prevention of posttransfusion hepatitis. Serum from five (0.5%) donors was positive for antibody to hepatitis C virus by second-generation enzyme immunoassay; in two, optical-density readings in enzyme immunoassay were greater than 2.0, but only one was positive for hepatitis C virus RNA by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The latter donor was also positive for antibody to HBcAg and had elevated serum ALT activity. The recipient of a unit of this donor's blood was the only one in whom posttransfusion hepatitis C developed (0.1% per unit transfused). Screening with antibody to hepatitis C virus was more specific than that with antibody to HBcAg or ALT in excluding donors from transmitting hepatitis C (99.6%, 79.4% and 98.8%, respectively). Both the sensitivity and negative predictive value of screening for antibody to hepatitis C virus were 100%, but the positive predictive value was only 20%. Forty-five blood recipients were considered susceptible to hepatitis B virus infection because testing for hepatitis B serology in serum (HBsAg, antibody to HBsAg and antibody to HBcAg) was negative before being transfused. Asymptomatic hepatitis B seroconversion developed in three (6.7%) recipients (1.1% per unit transfused).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) SN - 0270-9139 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7693569/Prevention_of_posttransfusion_hepatitis_B_and_C_by_screening_for_antibody_to_hepatitis_C_virus_and_antibody_to_HBcAg_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0270-9139&date=1993&volume=18&issue=5&spage=1045 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -