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Aviators at risk.
Aviat Space Environ Med. 1995 Jan; 66(1):35-9.AS

Abstract

Human error has been found to cause or contribute to most aviation accidents. Excess emotional stress may have an adverse effect on pilot performance and is known to increase the risk of an aircraft mishap. Family problems, social stressors, career instability, worry, aircraft accidents, and difficult flight schedules are a few of the many potential sources of emotional stress in aviation. Pilots who fail at stress coping may become depressed or even self-destructive. They may externalize their feelings, act out, or blame others for their misfortunes. The aviator at risk may demonstrate "warning signs" such as defensiveness, arrogance, hostility, financial irresponsibility, excesses in routine habits, fatigue, deteriorating pilot performance, or increased risk taking. The aeromedical practitioner's role is to educate aircrew members and help them understand stress and its effect on pilot performance. The time may come when an aviator is confronted by multiple stressors, and inadequate stress coping or failure on the part of the aviation community to recognize the "warning signs" may have disastrous results.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Utah, Rocky Mountain Center for Occupational and Environmental Health, Salt Lake City 84112.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7695549

Citation

Raymond, M W., and R Moser. "Aviators at Risk." Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, vol. 66, no. 1, 1995, pp. 35-9.
Raymond MW, Moser R. Aviators at risk. Aviat Space Environ Med. 1995;66(1):35-9.
Raymond, M. W., & Moser, R. (1995). Aviators at risk. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, 66(1), 35-9.
Raymond MW, Moser R. Aviators at Risk. Aviat Space Environ Med. 1995;66(1):35-9. PubMed PMID: 7695549.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Aviators at risk. AU - Raymond,M W, AU - Moser,R,Jr PY - 1995/1/1/pubmed PY - 2001/3/28/medline PY - 1995/1/1/entrez SP - 35 EP - 9 JF - Aviation, space, and environmental medicine JO - Aviat Space Environ Med VL - 66 IS - 1 N2 - Human error has been found to cause or contribute to most aviation accidents. Excess emotional stress may have an adverse effect on pilot performance and is known to increase the risk of an aircraft mishap. Family problems, social stressors, career instability, worry, aircraft accidents, and difficult flight schedules are a few of the many potential sources of emotional stress in aviation. Pilots who fail at stress coping may become depressed or even self-destructive. They may externalize their feelings, act out, or blame others for their misfortunes. The aviator at risk may demonstrate "warning signs" such as defensiveness, arrogance, hostility, financial irresponsibility, excesses in routine habits, fatigue, deteriorating pilot performance, or increased risk taking. The aeromedical practitioner's role is to educate aircrew members and help them understand stress and its effect on pilot performance. The time may come when an aviator is confronted by multiple stressors, and inadequate stress coping or failure on the part of the aviation community to recognize the "warning signs" may have disastrous results. SN - 0095-6562 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7695549/Aviators_at_risk_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/veteransandmilitaryhealth.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -