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The epidemiology of Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, and hookworm in children in the Ranomafana rainforest, Madagascar.
J Parasitol. 1995 Apr; 81(2):159-69.JP

Abstract

An epidemiological study of intestinal nematodes was conducted with 1,292 children, ranging from birth through 11 yr old, living in the Ranomafana rainforest of southeast Madagascar. Fecal examinations revealed prevalences of 78% for Ascaris lumbricoides, 38% for Trichuris trichiura, 16% for hookworm, and 0.4% for Schistosoma mansoni. Infection intensity was measured indirectly by fecal egg counts and directly by A. lumbricoides expulsion following treatment with pyrantel pamoate. The mean A. lumbricoides worm burden for children, 5-11 yr old, was 19.2 (SD 20.4) worms per child, with a median of 13 worms (n = 428). The distributions were overdispersed for all 3 nematodes. The age profiles showed a rapid acquisition of A. lumbricoides during infancy, increasing to 100% prevalence by age 10. After mebendazole anthelmintic treatment and a 12-mo reinfection period, the nematodes had rebounded to pretreatment prevalence and intensity levels. There was evidence for age-dependent predisposition of the children to infection intensity for each of the 3 nematodes. Dual species intensity correlation was consistently strong for A. lumbricoides and T. trichiura. The significantly higher prevalence and intensity of ascariasis in girls were thought to be related to exposure.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 27599-7400, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7707189

Citation

Kightlinger, L K., et al. "The Epidemiology of Ascaris Lumbricoides, Trichuris Trichiura, and Hookworm in Children in the Ranomafana Rainforest, Madagascar." The Journal of Parasitology, vol. 81, no. 2, 1995, pp. 159-69.
Kightlinger LK, Seed JR, Kightlinger MB. The epidemiology of Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, and hookworm in children in the Ranomafana rainforest, Madagascar. J Parasitol. 1995;81(2):159-69.
Kightlinger, L. K., Seed, J. R., & Kightlinger, M. B. (1995). The epidemiology of Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, and hookworm in children in the Ranomafana rainforest, Madagascar. The Journal of Parasitology, 81(2), 159-69.
Kightlinger LK, Seed JR, Kightlinger MB. The Epidemiology of Ascaris Lumbricoides, Trichuris Trichiura, and Hookworm in Children in the Ranomafana Rainforest, Madagascar. J Parasitol. 1995;81(2):159-69. PubMed PMID: 7707189.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The epidemiology of Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, and hookworm in children in the Ranomafana rainforest, Madagascar. AU - Kightlinger,L K, AU - Seed,J R, AU - Kightlinger,M B, PY - 1995/4/1/pubmed PY - 1995/4/1/medline PY - 1995/4/1/entrez SP - 159 EP - 69 JF - The Journal of parasitology JO - J Parasitol VL - 81 IS - 2 N2 - An epidemiological study of intestinal nematodes was conducted with 1,292 children, ranging from birth through 11 yr old, living in the Ranomafana rainforest of southeast Madagascar. Fecal examinations revealed prevalences of 78% for Ascaris lumbricoides, 38% for Trichuris trichiura, 16% for hookworm, and 0.4% for Schistosoma mansoni. Infection intensity was measured indirectly by fecal egg counts and directly by A. lumbricoides expulsion following treatment with pyrantel pamoate. The mean A. lumbricoides worm burden for children, 5-11 yr old, was 19.2 (SD 20.4) worms per child, with a median of 13 worms (n = 428). The distributions were overdispersed for all 3 nematodes. The age profiles showed a rapid acquisition of A. lumbricoides during infancy, increasing to 100% prevalence by age 10. After mebendazole anthelmintic treatment and a 12-mo reinfection period, the nematodes had rebounded to pretreatment prevalence and intensity levels. There was evidence for age-dependent predisposition of the children to infection intensity for each of the 3 nematodes. Dual species intensity correlation was consistently strong for A. lumbricoides and T. trichiura. The significantly higher prevalence and intensity of ascariasis in girls were thought to be related to exposure. SN - 0022-3395 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7707189/The_epidemiology_of_Ascaris_lumbricoides_Trichuris_trichiura_and_hookworm_in_children_in_the_Ranomafana_rainforest_Madagascar_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -