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Cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption as risk factors for colorectal adenomatous polyps.
J Natl Cancer Inst. 1995 Feb 15; 87(4):274-9.JNCI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Results of epidemiologic studies suggest that there is limited evidence for the association between cigarette smoking and risk of colorectal cancer. Cigarette smoking has been shown to increase the risk of colorectal adenomatous polyps, which are recognized as precursors of colorectal cancer, while few studies have examined the association between alcohol consumption and the development of adenomatous polyps.

PURPOSE

We examined the association between cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, and the presence of colorectal adenomatous polyps.

METHODS

Analyses were based on data from a case-control study of dietary and other lifestyle factors for colorectal adenomatous polyps. We assessed the risk of adenomatous polyps associated with total number of years of smoking, number of cigarettes smoked per day, and pack-years of smoking for past and current smokers separately. We also assessed the joint association between cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption on the risk of adenomatous polyps.

RESULTS

Current smokers who smoked more than 20 pack-years were at significantly higher risk of adenomatous polyps compared with never smokers (odds ratio [OR] = 2.56; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.28-5.14). Past smokers also had an increased risk of having adenomatous polyps, but no clear trend was observed for pack-years of smoking. Alcohol consumption was positively associated with risk of adenomatous polyps. Compared with nondrinkers, the strongest risk was observed for individuals who consumed 2.31-9.46 g alcohol per day (OR = 2.23; 95% CI = 1.29-3.83), and a decrease in risk was observed for individuals who consumed 9.47-67.36 g alcohol per day (OR = 1.63; 95% CI = 0.92-2.88). Among current smokers, a joint effect was observed for individuals who smoked and drank compared with those who never smoked and were not current drinkers (OR = 4.21; 95% CI = 1.88-9.41). For past smokers, a significant joint effect of smoking and current alcohol consumption was also observed, but the risk was not as strong as that for current smokers (OR = 2.61; 95% CI = 1.40-4.87).

CONCLUSIONS

These data provide further evidence of the positive association between cigarette smoking and the development of colorectal adenomatous polyps. The combination of cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption increased the risk of adenomatous polyps.

IMPLICATIONS

Future research should focus on the understanding of the role of cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption as these two factors relate to the evolution of colorectal adenomatous polyps and subsequent carcinogenesis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Texas-Houston Health Science Center, School of Public Health, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7707418

Citation

Martínez, M E., et al. "Cigarette Smoking and Alcohol Consumption as Risk Factors for Colorectal Adenomatous Polyps." Journal of the National Cancer Institute, vol. 87, no. 4, 1995, pp. 274-9.
Martínez ME, McPherson RS, Annegers JF, et al. Cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption as risk factors for colorectal adenomatous polyps. J Natl Cancer Inst. 1995;87(4):274-9.
Martínez, M. E., McPherson, R. S., Annegers, J. F., & Levin, B. (1995). Cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption as risk factors for colorectal adenomatous polyps. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 87(4), 274-9.
Martínez ME, et al. Cigarette Smoking and Alcohol Consumption as Risk Factors for Colorectal Adenomatous Polyps. J Natl Cancer Inst. 1995 Feb 15;87(4):274-9. PubMed PMID: 7707418.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption as risk factors for colorectal adenomatous polyps. AU - Martínez,M E, AU - McPherson,R S, AU - Annegers,J F, AU - Levin,B, PY - 1995/2/15/pubmed PY - 1995/2/15/medline PY - 1995/2/15/entrez SP - 274 EP - 9 JF - Journal of the National Cancer Institute JO - J Natl Cancer Inst VL - 87 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Results of epidemiologic studies suggest that there is limited evidence for the association between cigarette smoking and risk of colorectal cancer. Cigarette smoking has been shown to increase the risk of colorectal adenomatous polyps, which are recognized as precursors of colorectal cancer, while few studies have examined the association between alcohol consumption and the development of adenomatous polyps. PURPOSE: We examined the association between cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, and the presence of colorectal adenomatous polyps. METHODS: Analyses were based on data from a case-control study of dietary and other lifestyle factors for colorectal adenomatous polyps. We assessed the risk of adenomatous polyps associated with total number of years of smoking, number of cigarettes smoked per day, and pack-years of smoking for past and current smokers separately. We also assessed the joint association between cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption on the risk of adenomatous polyps. RESULTS: Current smokers who smoked more than 20 pack-years were at significantly higher risk of adenomatous polyps compared with never smokers (odds ratio [OR] = 2.56; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.28-5.14). Past smokers also had an increased risk of having adenomatous polyps, but no clear trend was observed for pack-years of smoking. Alcohol consumption was positively associated with risk of adenomatous polyps. Compared with nondrinkers, the strongest risk was observed for individuals who consumed 2.31-9.46 g alcohol per day (OR = 2.23; 95% CI = 1.29-3.83), and a decrease in risk was observed for individuals who consumed 9.47-67.36 g alcohol per day (OR = 1.63; 95% CI = 0.92-2.88). Among current smokers, a joint effect was observed for individuals who smoked and drank compared with those who never smoked and were not current drinkers (OR = 4.21; 95% CI = 1.88-9.41). For past smokers, a significant joint effect of smoking and current alcohol consumption was also observed, but the risk was not as strong as that for current smokers (OR = 2.61; 95% CI = 1.40-4.87). CONCLUSIONS: These data provide further evidence of the positive association between cigarette smoking and the development of colorectal adenomatous polyps. The combination of cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption increased the risk of adenomatous polyps. IMPLICATIONS: Future research should focus on the understanding of the role of cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption as these two factors relate to the evolution of colorectal adenomatous polyps and subsequent carcinogenesis. SN - 0027-8874 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7707418/Cigarette_smoking_and_alcohol_consumption_as_risk_factors_for_colorectal_adenomatous_polyps_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jnci/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jnci/87.4.274 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -