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Safe administration of the measles vaccine to children allergic to eggs.
N Engl J Med 1995; 332(19):1262-6NEJM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The safety of administering the combined measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine to patients who are allergic to eggs has been debated for decades because of concern about potential anaphylaxis, since the live attenuated virus used in the vaccine is grown in cultured chick-embryo fibroblasts.

METHODS

We recruited 54 children (mean age, 18.5 months) who had not previously been vaccinated and were allergic to eggs. The children's histories of allergy were confirmed with skin tests and double-blind, placebo-controlled food-challenge tests; some children also underwent skin testing with the MMR vaccine. We then routinely administered the vaccine to the children in one subcutaneous (0.5-ml) dose.

RESULTS

All 54 children had positive results on skin testing with egg. Allergy to eggs was confirmed in 26 of the children by convincing histories of anaphylaxis after the ingestion of eggs, in 22 children by food-challenge tests, and in 6 patients by convincing histories of recent allergic reactions occurring after the ingestion of eggs. Of the 17 children who underwent skin testing with the MMR vaccine, 3 had positive results. All 54 children received the MMR vaccine as a single subcutaneous injection; none had an immediate or delayed adverse reaction.

CONCLUSIONS

The MMR vaccine can be safely administered in a single dose to children with allergy to eggs, even those with severe hypersensitivity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, Arkansas Children's Hospital Research Institute, Little Rock, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7708070

Citation

James, J M., et al. "Safe Administration of the Measles Vaccine to Children Allergic to Eggs." The New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 332, no. 19, 1995, pp. 1262-6.
James JM, Burks AW, Roberson PK, et al. Safe administration of the measles vaccine to children allergic to eggs. N Engl J Med. 1995;332(19):1262-6.
James, J. M., Burks, A. W., Roberson, P. K., & Sampson, H. A. (1995). Safe administration of the measles vaccine to children allergic to eggs. The New England Journal of Medicine, 332(19), pp. 1262-6.
James JM, et al. Safe Administration of the Measles Vaccine to Children Allergic to Eggs. N Engl J Med. 1995 May 11;332(19):1262-6. PubMed PMID: 7708070.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Safe administration of the measles vaccine to children allergic to eggs. AU - James,J M, AU - Burks,A W, AU - Roberson,P K, AU - Sampson,H A, PY - 1995/5/11/pubmed PY - 1995/5/11/medline PY - 1995/5/11/entrez SP - 1262 EP - 6 JF - The New England journal of medicine JO - N. Engl. J. Med. VL - 332 IS - 19 N2 - BACKGROUND: The safety of administering the combined measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine to patients who are allergic to eggs has been debated for decades because of concern about potential anaphylaxis, since the live attenuated virus used in the vaccine is grown in cultured chick-embryo fibroblasts. METHODS: We recruited 54 children (mean age, 18.5 months) who had not previously been vaccinated and were allergic to eggs. The children's histories of allergy were confirmed with skin tests and double-blind, placebo-controlled food-challenge tests; some children also underwent skin testing with the MMR vaccine. We then routinely administered the vaccine to the children in one subcutaneous (0.5-ml) dose. RESULTS: All 54 children had positive results on skin testing with egg. Allergy to eggs was confirmed in 26 of the children by convincing histories of anaphylaxis after the ingestion of eggs, in 22 children by food-challenge tests, and in 6 patients by convincing histories of recent allergic reactions occurring after the ingestion of eggs. Of the 17 children who underwent skin testing with the MMR vaccine, 3 had positive results. All 54 children received the MMR vaccine as a single subcutaneous injection; none had an immediate or delayed adverse reaction. CONCLUSIONS: The MMR vaccine can be safely administered in a single dose to children with allergy to eggs, even those with severe hypersensitivity. SN - 0028-4793 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7708070/Safe_administration_of_the_measles_vaccine_to_children_allergic_to_eggs_ L2 - http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJM199505113321904?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -