Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Efficacy and safety of lowering dietary intake of fat and cholesterol in children with elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The Dietary Intervention Study in Children (DISC). The Writing Group for the DISC Collaborative Research Group.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess the efficacy and safety of lowering dietary intake of total fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol to decrease low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels in children.

DESIGN

Six-center randomized controlled clinical trial.

PARTICIPANTS

Prepubertal boys (n = 362) and girls (n = 301) aged 8 to 10 years with LDL-C levels greater than or equal to the 80th and less than the 98th percentiles for age and sex were randomized into an intervention group (n = 334) and a usual care group (n = 329).

INTERVENTION

Behavioral intervention to promote adherence to a diet providing 28% of energy from total fat, less than 8% from saturated fat, up to 9% from polyunsaturated fat, and less than 75 mg/4200 kJ (1000 kcal) per day of cholesterol (not to exceed 150 mg/d).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

The primary efficacy measure was the mean LDL-C level at 3 years. Primary safety measures were mean height and serum ferritin levels at 3 years. Secondary efficacy outcomes were mean LDL-C levels at 1 year and mean total cholesterol levels at 1 and 3 years. Secondary safety outcomes included red blood cell folate values; serum zinc, retinol, and albumin levels; serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) values, LDL-C:HDL-C ratio, and total triglyceride levels; sexual maturation; and psychosocial health.

RESULTS

At 3 years, dietary total fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol levels decreased significantly in the intervention group compared with the usual care group (all P < .001). Levels of LDL-C decreased in the intervention and usual care groups by 0.40 mmol/L (15.4 mg/dL) and 0.31 mmol/L (11.9 mg/dL), respectively. Adjusting for baseline level and sex and imputting values for missing data, the mean difference between the groups was -0.08 mmol/L (-3.23 mg/dL) (95% confidence interval [CI], -0.15 to -0.01 mmol/L [-5.6 to -0.5 mg/dL]), which was significant (P = .02). There were no significant differences between the groups in adjusted mean height or serum ferritin levels (P > .05) or other safety outcomes.

CONCLUSIONS

The dietary intervention achieved modest lowering of LDL-C levels over 3 years while maintaining adequate growth, iron stores, nutritional adequacy, and psychological well-being during the critical growth period of adolescence.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Source

    JAMA 273:18 1995 May 10 pg 1429-35

    MeSH

    Analysis of Variance
    Blood Chemical Analysis
    Body Height
    Child
    Cholesterol, Dietary
    Cholesterol, LDL
    Dietary Fats
    Energy Intake
    Female
    Ferritins
    Humans
    Hypercholesterolemia
    Longitudinal Studies
    Male
    Mental Health
    Nutrition Assessment

    Pub Type(s)

    Clinical Trial
    Journal Article
    Multicenter Study
    Randomized Controlled Trial
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    7723156

    Citation

    "Efficacy and Safety of Lowering Dietary Intake of Fat and Cholesterol in Children With Elevated Low-density Lipoprotein Cholesterol. the Dietary Intervention Study in Children (DISC). the Writing Group for the DISC Collaborative Research Group." JAMA, vol. 273, no. 18, 1995, pp. 1429-35.
    Efficacy and safety of lowering dietary intake of fat and cholesterol in children with elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The Dietary Intervention Study in Children (DISC). The Writing Group for the DISC Collaborative Research Group. JAMA. 1995;273(18):1429-35.
    (1995). Efficacy and safety of lowering dietary intake of fat and cholesterol in children with elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The Dietary Intervention Study in Children (DISC). The Writing Group for the DISC Collaborative Research Group. JAMA, 273(18), pp. 1429-35.
    Efficacy and Safety of Lowering Dietary Intake of Fat and Cholesterol in Children With Elevated Low-density Lipoprotein Cholesterol. the Dietary Intervention Study in Children (DISC). the Writing Group for the DISC Collaborative Research Group. JAMA. 1995 May 10;273(18):1429-35. PubMed PMID: 7723156.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Efficacy and safety of lowering dietary intake of fat and cholesterol in children with elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The Dietary Intervention Study in Children (DISC). The Writing Group for the DISC Collaborative Research Group. PY - 1995/5/10/pubmed PY - 1995/5/10/medline PY - 1995/5/10/entrez SP - 1429 EP - 35 JF - JAMA JO - JAMA VL - 273 IS - 18 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy and safety of lowering dietary intake of total fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol to decrease low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels in children. DESIGN: Six-center randomized controlled clinical trial. PARTICIPANTS: Prepubertal boys (n = 362) and girls (n = 301) aged 8 to 10 years with LDL-C levels greater than or equal to the 80th and less than the 98th percentiles for age and sex were randomized into an intervention group (n = 334) and a usual care group (n = 329). INTERVENTION: Behavioral intervention to promote adherence to a diet providing 28% of energy from total fat, less than 8% from saturated fat, up to 9% from polyunsaturated fat, and less than 75 mg/4200 kJ (1000 kcal) per day of cholesterol (not to exceed 150 mg/d). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary efficacy measure was the mean LDL-C level at 3 years. Primary safety measures were mean height and serum ferritin levels at 3 years. Secondary efficacy outcomes were mean LDL-C levels at 1 year and mean total cholesterol levels at 1 and 3 years. Secondary safety outcomes included red blood cell folate values; serum zinc, retinol, and albumin levels; serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) values, LDL-C:HDL-C ratio, and total triglyceride levels; sexual maturation; and psychosocial health. RESULTS: At 3 years, dietary total fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol levels decreased significantly in the intervention group compared with the usual care group (all P < .001). Levels of LDL-C decreased in the intervention and usual care groups by 0.40 mmol/L (15.4 mg/dL) and 0.31 mmol/L (11.9 mg/dL), respectively. Adjusting for baseline level and sex and imputting values for missing data, the mean difference between the groups was -0.08 mmol/L (-3.23 mg/dL) (95% confidence interval [CI], -0.15 to -0.01 mmol/L [-5.6 to -0.5 mg/dL]), which was significant (P = .02). There were no significant differences between the groups in adjusted mean height or serum ferritin levels (P > .05) or other safety outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: The dietary intervention achieved modest lowering of LDL-C levels over 3 years while maintaining adequate growth, iron stores, nutritional adequacy, and psychological well-being during the critical growth period of adolescence. SN - 0098-7484 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7723156/Efficacy_and_safety_of_lowering_dietary_intake_of_fat_and_cholesterol_in_children_with_elevated_low_density_lipoprotein_cholesterol__The_Dietary_Intervention_Study_in_Children__DISC___The_Writing_Group_for_the_DISC_Collaborative_Research_Group_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/vol/273/pg/1429 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -