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Neuroendocrine responses to real and simulated BA Hawk MK 51 flight.
Aviat Space Environ Med. 1995 Feb; 66(2):108-13.AS

Abstract

The effects of psychological workload on the plasma levels of eight neuroendocrine hormones were studied in 5 undergraduate and 5 senior military pilots of the Finnish Air Force (FAF). All subjects performed the same short-term basic flight mission, which included the following: 1) start; 2) ILS-approach in minimum weather conditions; 3) visual approach; and 4) landing. The mission was performed twice: first with the BA Hawk MK 51 simulator with minimal G-forces and after that with a BA Hawk MK 51 jet trainer with Gz-forces below +2. Blood samples were collected 30 min before and 10 min after the mission and were measured for adrenaline, noradrenaline, ACTH, beta-endorphin, prolactin, vasopressin (AVP), atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), and cortisol. The plasma levels of adrenaline, noradrenaline, ACTH, beta-endorphin, and cortisol did not change significantly in response to simulated or real flight. Plasma prolactin levels increased significantly (p = 0.037) in all subjects after the mission performed with jet trainer, and the increase was especially great in cadets. However, the same mission performed with the simulator did not raise plasma prolactin levels. This finding suggests that the psychological workload in a flight simulator does not correspond to the psychological workload in a real jet trainer, at least not in basic flying. Plasma AVP increased significantly (p = 0.032) after the mission performed with the simulator in cadets; this increase can be described as a "first-time effect." Plasma ANP also increased significantly (p < 0.05) after a real jet trainer flight.(

ABSTRACT

TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Physiology, University of Oulu, Finland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7726772

Citation

Leino, T, et al. "Neuroendocrine Responses to Real and Simulated BA Hawk MK 51 Flight." Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, vol. 66, no. 2, 1995, pp. 108-13.
Leino T, Leppäluoto J, Huttunen P, et al. Neuroendocrine responses to real and simulated BA Hawk MK 51 flight. Aviat Space Environ Med. 1995;66(2):108-13.
Leino, T., Leppäluoto, J., Huttunen, P., Ruokonen, A., & Kuronen, P. (1995). Neuroendocrine responses to real and simulated BA Hawk MK 51 flight. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, 66(2), 108-13.
Leino T, et al. Neuroendocrine Responses to Real and Simulated BA Hawk MK 51 Flight. Aviat Space Environ Med. 1995;66(2):108-13. PubMed PMID: 7726772.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Neuroendocrine responses to real and simulated BA Hawk MK 51 flight. AU - Leino,T, AU - Leppäluoto,J, AU - Huttunen,P, AU - Ruokonen,A, AU - Kuronen,P, PY - 1995/2/1/pubmed PY - 1995/2/1/medline PY - 1995/2/1/entrez SP - 108 EP - 13 JF - Aviation, space, and environmental medicine JO - Aviat Space Environ Med VL - 66 IS - 2 N2 - The effects of psychological workload on the plasma levels of eight neuroendocrine hormones were studied in 5 undergraduate and 5 senior military pilots of the Finnish Air Force (FAF). All subjects performed the same short-term basic flight mission, which included the following: 1) start; 2) ILS-approach in minimum weather conditions; 3) visual approach; and 4) landing. The mission was performed twice: first with the BA Hawk MK 51 simulator with minimal G-forces and after that with a BA Hawk MK 51 jet trainer with Gz-forces below +2. Blood samples were collected 30 min before and 10 min after the mission and were measured for adrenaline, noradrenaline, ACTH, beta-endorphin, prolactin, vasopressin (AVP), atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), and cortisol. The plasma levels of adrenaline, noradrenaline, ACTH, beta-endorphin, and cortisol did not change significantly in response to simulated or real flight. Plasma prolactin levels increased significantly (p = 0.037) in all subjects after the mission performed with jet trainer, and the increase was especially great in cadets. However, the same mission performed with the simulator did not raise plasma prolactin levels. This finding suggests that the psychological workload in a flight simulator does not correspond to the psychological workload in a real jet trainer, at least not in basic flying. Plasma AVP increased significantly (p = 0.032) after the mission performed with the simulator in cadets; this increase can be described as a "first-time effect." Plasma ANP also increased significantly (p < 0.05) after a real jet trainer flight.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) SN - 0095-6562 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7726772/Neuroendocrine_responses_to_real_and_simulated_BA_Hawk_MK_51_flight_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/hormones.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -