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Self-treatment of malaria in a rural area of western Kenya.
Bull World Health Organ. 1995; 73(2):229-36.BW

Abstract

Reported are the results of a study of residents' knowledge about malaria and antimalarial drugs and of their treatment-seeking behaviour in a rural area of western Kenya. The study subjects were generally well-informed about the symptoms of the disease. Malaria was perceived as a relatively mild illness, much less severe than acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), measles, difficulty in breathing, and diarrhoea. Self-treatment was extremely common: of 138 episodes of febrile illness, 60% were treated at home with herbal remedies or medicines purchased at local shops, and only 18% received treatment at a health centre or hospital; no treatment was sought by the remainder. Commercially available chloroquine preparations were perceived as more effective than either antipyretics or herbal remedies for the treatment of malaria, and injections were regarded as more effective than oral medications. 4-Amino-quinolines were used to treat 58% of febrile illnesses but in only 12% of the cases was a curative dose of > or = 25 mg/kg body weight employed. Even attendance at a health centre did not ensure adequate treatment because of the common practice of sharing medication among family members. Greatly increased attention should be paid to the role of home treatment of malaria when policies are being developed for the management of febrile illnesses in sub-Saharan Africa.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Parasitic Diseases (F-22), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Chamblee, GA 30341-3724, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7743595

Citation

Ruebush, T K., et al. "Self-treatment of Malaria in a Rural Area of Western Kenya." Bulletin of the World Health Organization, vol. 73, no. 2, 1995, pp. 229-36.
Ruebush TK, Kern MK, Campbell CC, et al. Self-treatment of malaria in a rural area of western Kenya. Bull World Health Organ. 1995;73(2):229-36.
Ruebush, T. K., Kern, M. K., Campbell, C. C., & Oloo, A. J. (1995). Self-treatment of malaria in a rural area of western Kenya. Bulletin of the World Health Organization, 73(2), 229-36.
Ruebush TK, et al. Self-treatment of Malaria in a Rural Area of Western Kenya. Bull World Health Organ. 1995;73(2):229-36. PubMed PMID: 7743595.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Self-treatment of malaria in a rural area of western Kenya. AU - Ruebush,T K, AU - Kern,M K, AU - Campbell,C C, AU - Oloo,A J, PY - 1995/1/1/pubmed PY - 1995/1/1/medline PY - 1995/1/1/entrez KW - Africa KW - Africa South Of The Sahara KW - Demographic Factors KW - Developing Countries KW - Diseases KW - Drugs--therapeutic use KW - Eastern Africa KW - English Speaking Africa KW - Health KW - Health Surveys KW - Kenya KW - Knowledge KW - Malaria KW - Parasitic Diseases KW - Population KW - Population Characteristics KW - Rural Population KW - Self Care KW - Treatment SP - 229 EP - 36 JF - Bulletin of the World Health Organization JO - Bull World Health Organ VL - 73 IS - 2 N2 - Reported are the results of a study of residents' knowledge about malaria and antimalarial drugs and of their treatment-seeking behaviour in a rural area of western Kenya. The study subjects were generally well-informed about the symptoms of the disease. Malaria was perceived as a relatively mild illness, much less severe than acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), measles, difficulty in breathing, and diarrhoea. Self-treatment was extremely common: of 138 episodes of febrile illness, 60% were treated at home with herbal remedies or medicines purchased at local shops, and only 18% received treatment at a health centre or hospital; no treatment was sought by the remainder. Commercially available chloroquine preparations were perceived as more effective than either antipyretics or herbal remedies for the treatment of malaria, and injections were regarded as more effective than oral medications. 4-Amino-quinolines were used to treat 58% of febrile illnesses but in only 12% of the cases was a curative dose of > or = 25 mg/kg body weight employed. Even attendance at a health centre did not ensure adequate treatment because of the common practice of sharing medication among family members. Greatly increased attention should be paid to the role of home treatment of malaria when policies are being developed for the management of febrile illnesses in sub-Saharan Africa. SN - 0042-9686 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7743595/Self_treatment_of_malaria_in_a_rural_area_of_western_Kenya_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/7743595/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -