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Epidemiology of the rheumatic diseases.
Curr Opin Rheumatol 1995; 7(2):82-6CO

Abstract

Epidemiologic studies are important for both understanding and defining rheumatology practice. Controversy still exists over whether the incidence of rheumatoid arthritis is declining, and genetic studies indicate a diversity of HLA haplotypes in rheumatoid arthritis. Large longitudinal osteoarthritis studies have helped define diagnostic criteria and the role of obesity in disease progression. The negative association between osteoarthritis and osteoporosis at specific sites continues to be explored, and the value of long-term estrogen therapy in preventing bone loss has been examined. Both retrospective and prospective population studies have been used to describe the relationship between silicone gel breast implants and connective tissue disease. These and other studies have helped to define the important role of epidemiologic research in the understanding of rheumatic diseases.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Rheumatology, Queen Alexandra Hospital, Cosham, Portsmouth, UK.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7766499

Citation

Peacock, D J., and C Cooper. "Epidemiology of the Rheumatic Diseases." Current Opinion in Rheumatology, vol. 7, no. 2, 1995, pp. 82-6.
Peacock DJ, Cooper C. Epidemiology of the rheumatic diseases. Curr Opin Rheumatol. 1995;7(2):82-6.
Peacock, D. J., & Cooper, C. (1995). Epidemiology of the rheumatic diseases. Current Opinion in Rheumatology, 7(2), pp. 82-6.
Peacock DJ, Cooper C. Epidemiology of the Rheumatic Diseases. Curr Opin Rheumatol. 1995;7(2):82-6. PubMed PMID: 7766499.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Epidemiology of the rheumatic diseases. AU - Peacock,D J, AU - Cooper,C, PY - 1995/3/1/pubmed PY - 1995/3/1/medline PY - 1995/3/1/entrez SP - 82 EP - 6 JF - Current opinion in rheumatology JO - Curr Opin Rheumatol VL - 7 IS - 2 N2 - Epidemiologic studies are important for both understanding and defining rheumatology practice. Controversy still exists over whether the incidence of rheumatoid arthritis is declining, and genetic studies indicate a diversity of HLA haplotypes in rheumatoid arthritis. Large longitudinal osteoarthritis studies have helped define diagnostic criteria and the role of obesity in disease progression. The negative association between osteoarthritis and osteoporosis at specific sites continues to be explored, and the value of long-term estrogen therapy in preventing bone loss has been examined. Both retrospective and prospective population studies have been used to describe the relationship between silicone gel breast implants and connective tissue disease. These and other studies have helped to define the important role of epidemiologic research in the understanding of rheumatic diseases. SN - 1040-8711 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7766499/Epidemiology_of_the_rheumatic_diseases_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=7766499.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -