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Perspective: hypothesis: serum IgG antibody is sufficient to confer protection against infectious diseases by inactivating the inoculum.
J Infect Dis. 1995 Jun; 171(6):1387-98.JI

Abstract

The theory proposed is that a critical level of specific serum IgG is sufficient to confer protection against infectious diseases by inactivating the inoculum of the pathogen. This theory relies heavily on evaluation of licensed vaccines and includes the following: Measurement of serum antibodies only reliably predicts the efficacy of vaccines, according to regulatory agencies. Serum IgG antibodies alone account for the protection conferred by passive immunization. "Herd" immunity conferred by vaccines on viral and bacterial diseases is best explained by serum antibodies that inactivate the inoculum on mucosal surfaces, thus reducing the pathogen's transmission. Once the disease is manifest, serum antibodies induced by active immunization will neither relieve symptoms nor eliminate the pathogen; specific IgG must be present when the host encounters the pathogen in order to confer protective immunity. Information about the initial pathogen-host contact is vital, whereas knowledge of the symptomatology of the disease may not be essential for vaccine development.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Laboratory of Developmental and Molecular Immunity, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7769272

Citation

Robbins, J B., et al. "Perspective: Hypothesis: Serum IgG Antibody Is Sufficient to Confer Protection Against Infectious Diseases By Inactivating the Inoculum." The Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 171, no. 6, 1995, pp. 1387-98.
Robbins JB, Schneerson R, Szu SC. Perspective: hypothesis: serum IgG antibody is sufficient to confer protection against infectious diseases by inactivating the inoculum. J Infect Dis. 1995;171(6):1387-98.
Robbins, J. B., Schneerson, R., & Szu, S. C. (1995). Perspective: hypothesis: serum IgG antibody is sufficient to confer protection against infectious diseases by inactivating the inoculum. The Journal of Infectious Diseases, 171(6), 1387-98.
Robbins JB, Schneerson R, Szu SC. Perspective: Hypothesis: Serum IgG Antibody Is Sufficient to Confer Protection Against Infectious Diseases By Inactivating the Inoculum. J Infect Dis. 1995;171(6):1387-98. PubMed PMID: 7769272.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Perspective: hypothesis: serum IgG antibody is sufficient to confer protection against infectious diseases by inactivating the inoculum. AU - Robbins,J B, AU - Schneerson,R, AU - Szu,S C, PY - 1995/6/1/pubmed PY - 1995/6/1/medline PY - 1995/6/1/entrez SP - 1387 EP - 98 JF - The Journal of infectious diseases JO - J Infect Dis VL - 171 IS - 6 N2 - The theory proposed is that a critical level of specific serum IgG is sufficient to confer protection against infectious diseases by inactivating the inoculum of the pathogen. This theory relies heavily on evaluation of licensed vaccines and includes the following: Measurement of serum antibodies only reliably predicts the efficacy of vaccines, according to regulatory agencies. Serum IgG antibodies alone account for the protection conferred by passive immunization. "Herd" immunity conferred by vaccines on viral and bacterial diseases is best explained by serum antibodies that inactivate the inoculum on mucosal surfaces, thus reducing the pathogen's transmission. Once the disease is manifest, serum antibodies induced by active immunization will neither relieve symptoms nor eliminate the pathogen; specific IgG must be present when the host encounters the pathogen in order to confer protective immunity. Information about the initial pathogen-host contact is vital, whereas knowledge of the symptomatology of the disease may not be essential for vaccine development. SN - 0022-1899 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7769272/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jid/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/infdis/171.6.1387 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -