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Infant feeding and nutritional status: the dilemma of mothers in rural Senegal.
Eur J Clin Nutr 1995; 49(3):179-88EJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To describe infant feeding practices in rural Senegal in relation to age and nutritional status. The main hypothesis to be tested was whether mothers modulate feeding in response to growth and nutritional status of their infants.

DESIGN

A cross-sectional survey using qualitative 24-h recalls and lifetime recalls to assess feeding practices, and using weight and recumbent length measurements to assess nutritional status.

SETTING

Three health clinics in the Fatick region, a rural area of Senegal, West Africa, covering a population of 26,600.

SUBJECTS

All 2-10-month-old infants attending four immunization sessions in 1991 (n = 1174; 80% of convoked infants).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Prevalence of feeding with additional food (gruel, family diet and food of animal origin), weight-for-length and length-for-age.

RESULTS

All infants were breastfed. A supplement had been given the day before the survey to 10% of infants aged 2-3.9 months, 30% of infants aged 4-5.9 months and 45% of those aged 6-6.9 months. The main food items were watery millet gruel and family diet (millet or rice). Gruel was given in response to perceived breast-milk insufficiency. Animal products were seldom eaten at any age. Length-for-age and weight-for-length were significantly lower among infants supplemented with millet gruel, when adjusted for age; while no such relationship was found with family diet.

CONCLUSION

Mothers preferentially fed gruel to small, thin infants.

Authors+Show Affiliations

ORSTOM, Institut Français de Recherche Scientifique pour le Développement en Coopération, Montpellier, France.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7774534

Citation

Simondon, K B., and F Simondon. "Infant Feeding and Nutritional Status: the Dilemma of Mothers in Rural Senegal." European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 49, no. 3, 1995, pp. 179-88.
Simondon KB, Simondon F. Infant feeding and nutritional status: the dilemma of mothers in rural Senegal. Eur J Clin Nutr. 1995;49(3):179-88.
Simondon, K. B., & Simondon, F. (1995). Infant feeding and nutritional status: the dilemma of mothers in rural Senegal. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 49(3), pp. 179-88.
Simondon KB, Simondon F. Infant Feeding and Nutritional Status: the Dilemma of Mothers in Rural Senegal. Eur J Clin Nutr. 1995;49(3):179-88. PubMed PMID: 7774534.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Infant feeding and nutritional status: the dilemma of mothers in rural Senegal. AU - Simondon,K B, AU - Simondon,F, PY - 1995/3/1/pubmed PY - 1995/3/1/medline PY - 1995/3/1/entrez KW - Africa KW - Africa South Of The Sahara KW - Biology KW - Body Weight--changes KW - Breast Feeding KW - Child Development KW - Demographic Factors KW - Developing Countries KW - French Speaking Africa KW - Growth KW - Health KW - Infant Nutrition KW - Nutrition KW - Nutrition Surveys KW - Physiology KW - Population KW - Population Characteristics KW - Research Report KW - Rural Population KW - Senegal KW - Supplementary Feeding KW - Weaning KW - Western Africa SP - 179 EP - 88 JF - European journal of clinical nutrition JO - Eur J Clin Nutr VL - 49 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To describe infant feeding practices in rural Senegal in relation to age and nutritional status. The main hypothesis to be tested was whether mothers modulate feeding in response to growth and nutritional status of their infants. DESIGN: A cross-sectional survey using qualitative 24-h recalls and lifetime recalls to assess feeding practices, and using weight and recumbent length measurements to assess nutritional status. SETTING: Three health clinics in the Fatick region, a rural area of Senegal, West Africa, covering a population of 26,600. SUBJECTS: All 2-10-month-old infants attending four immunization sessions in 1991 (n = 1174; 80% of convoked infants). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Prevalence of feeding with additional food (gruel, family diet and food of animal origin), weight-for-length and length-for-age. RESULTS: All infants were breastfed. A supplement had been given the day before the survey to 10% of infants aged 2-3.9 months, 30% of infants aged 4-5.9 months and 45% of those aged 6-6.9 months. The main food items were watery millet gruel and family diet (millet or rice). Gruel was given in response to perceived breast-milk insufficiency. Animal products were seldom eaten at any age. Length-for-age and weight-for-length were significantly lower among infants supplemented with millet gruel, when adjusted for age; while no such relationship was found with family diet. CONCLUSION: Mothers preferentially fed gruel to small, thin infants. SN - 0954-3007 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7774534/Infant_feeding_and_nutritional_status:_the_dilemma_of_mothers_in_rural_Senegal_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/toddlerdevelopment.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -