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Measurement of volatile organic compounds in exhaled breath as collected in evacuated electropolished canisters.
J Chromatogr B Biomed Appl. 1995 Mar 24; 665(2):271-9.JC

Abstract

A set of three complementary analytical methods were developed specifically for exhaled breath as collected in evacuated stainless steel canisters using gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric detection. The first is a screening method to quantify the carbon dioxide component (generally at 4-5% concentration), the second method measures the very volatile high-level endogenous compounds [e.g. acetone and isoprene at 500-1000 parts per billion by volume (ppbv), methanol, ethanol, dimethylsulfide at 2-10 ppbv], and the third method is designed to measure trace-level environmental contaminants and other endogenous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) (sub-ppbv) in breath. The canister-based sample format allows all three methods to be applied to each individual sample for complete constituent characterization. Application of these methods is shown to be useful in the following ways: analysis of CO2 levels indicates the approximate quantity of alveolar breath collected (as opposed to whole breath) in a sample; levels of major endogenous compounds are shown to be influenced by physical activities and subsequent recovery periods; and environmental exposures to xenobiotic VOCs can be characterized by assessment of post-exposure breath elimination curves. The instrumentation and methodology are described and example chromatograms and quantitative data plots demonstrating the utility of the methods are presented.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Atmospheric Research and Exposure Assessment Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7795807

Citation

Pleil, J D., and A B. Lindstrom. "Measurement of Volatile Organic Compounds in Exhaled Breath as Collected in Evacuated Electropolished Canisters." Journal of Chromatography. B, Biomedical Applications, vol. 665, no. 2, 1995, pp. 271-9.
Pleil JD, Lindstrom AB. Measurement of volatile organic compounds in exhaled breath as collected in evacuated electropolished canisters. J Chromatogr B Biomed Appl. 1995;665(2):271-9.
Pleil, J. D., & Lindstrom, A. B. (1995). Measurement of volatile organic compounds in exhaled breath as collected in evacuated electropolished canisters. Journal of Chromatography. B, Biomedical Applications, 665(2), 271-9.
Pleil JD, Lindstrom AB. Measurement of Volatile Organic Compounds in Exhaled Breath as Collected in Evacuated Electropolished Canisters. J Chromatogr B Biomed Appl. 1995 Mar 24;665(2):271-9. PubMed PMID: 7795807.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Measurement of volatile organic compounds in exhaled breath as collected in evacuated electropolished canisters. AU - Pleil,J D, AU - Lindstrom,A B, PY - 1995/3/24/pubmed PY - 1995/3/24/medline PY - 1995/3/24/entrez SP - 271 EP - 9 JF - Journal of chromatography. B, Biomedical applications JO - J Chromatogr B Biomed Appl VL - 665 IS - 2 N2 - A set of three complementary analytical methods were developed specifically for exhaled breath as collected in evacuated stainless steel canisters using gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric detection. The first is a screening method to quantify the carbon dioxide component (generally at 4-5% concentration), the second method measures the very volatile high-level endogenous compounds [e.g. acetone and isoprene at 500-1000 parts per billion by volume (ppbv), methanol, ethanol, dimethylsulfide at 2-10 ppbv], and the third method is designed to measure trace-level environmental contaminants and other endogenous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) (sub-ppbv) in breath. The canister-based sample format allows all three methods to be applied to each individual sample for complete constituent characterization. Application of these methods is shown to be useful in the following ways: analysis of CO2 levels indicates the approximate quantity of alveolar breath collected (as opposed to whole breath) in a sample; levels of major endogenous compounds are shown to be influenced by physical activities and subsequent recovery periods; and environmental exposures to xenobiotic VOCs can be characterized by assessment of post-exposure breath elimination curves. The instrumentation and methodology are described and example chromatograms and quantitative data plots demonstrating the utility of the methods are presented. SN - 1572-6495 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7795807/Measurement_of_volatile_organic_compounds_in_exhaled_breath_as_collected_in_evacuated_electropolished_canisters_ L2 - https://www.lens.org/lens/search/patent/list?q=citation_id:7795807 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -