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Esophageal varices.
Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am. 1994 Oct; 4(4):747-71.GE

Abstract

Numerous conditions lead to portal hypertension with the development of esophageal varices. Treatment for acute variceal hemorrhage should progress in a logical, stepwise fashion. Therapy after fluid resuscitation includes vasopressin, somatostatin, or a Sengstaken-Blakemore tube. This is followed by treatment with sclerotherapy, variceal ligation, or a combination of both. Continued bleeding is managed by more invasive measures that include radiologic embolization or shunting, esophageal transection, distal splenorenal shunt, or liver transplantation. Beta-blockade may be useful to prevent recurrent bleeding in compliant patients without medical conditions that would preclude use of beta-blockade. Once control of the bleeding has been achieved, sclerotherapy or ligation should be used to obliterate the varices, but prophylactic use of sclerosant is not particularly beneficial.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7812645

Citation

Goff, J S.. "Esophageal Varices." Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America, vol. 4, no. 4, 1994, pp. 747-71.
Goff JS. Esophageal varices. Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am. 1994;4(4):747-71.
Goff, J. S. (1994). Esophageal varices. Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America, 4(4), 747-71.
Goff JS. Esophageal Varices. Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am. 1994;4(4):747-71. PubMed PMID: 7812645.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Esophageal varices. A1 - Goff,J S, PY - 1994/10/1/pubmed PY - 1994/10/1/medline PY - 1994/10/1/entrez SP - 747 EP - 71 JF - Gastrointestinal endoscopy clinics of North America JO - Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am VL - 4 IS - 4 N2 - Numerous conditions lead to portal hypertension with the development of esophageal varices. Treatment for acute variceal hemorrhage should progress in a logical, stepwise fashion. Therapy after fluid resuscitation includes vasopressin, somatostatin, or a Sengstaken-Blakemore tube. This is followed by treatment with sclerotherapy, variceal ligation, or a combination of both. Continued bleeding is managed by more invasive measures that include radiologic embolization or shunting, esophageal transection, distal splenorenal shunt, or liver transplantation. Beta-blockade may be useful to prevent recurrent bleeding in compliant patients without medical conditions that would preclude use of beta-blockade. Once control of the bleeding has been achieved, sclerotherapy or ligation should be used to obliterate the varices, but prophylactic use of sclerosant is not particularly beneficial. SN - 1052-5157 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7812645/Esophageal_varices_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -