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Inhibition of giant-planet formation by rapid gas depletion around young stars.
Nature 1995; 373(6514):494-6Nat

Abstract

Although stars form from clouds of gas and dust, there are insignificant amounts of gas around ordinary (Sun-like) stars. This suggests that hydrogen and helium, the primary constituents of planets such as Jupiter and Saturn, are not easily retained in orbit as a star matures. The gas-giant planets in the Solar System must therefore have formed rapidly. Models of their formation generally suggest that a solid core formed in < or = 10(6) yr, followed by the accretion of the massive gaseous envelope in approximately 10(7) yr (refs 1-5). But how and when the gas of the solar nebula dissipated, and how this compares with the predicted timescale of gas-giant formation, remains unclear, in part because direct observations of circumstellar gas have been made only for stars either younger or older than the critical range of 10(6)-10(7) yr (refs 8-15). Here we report observations of the molecular gas surrounding 20 stars whose ages are likely to be in this range. The gas dissipates rapidly; after a few million years the mass remaining is typically much less than the mass of Jupiter. Thus, if gas-giant planets are common in the Galaxy, they must form even more quickly than present models suggest.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles 90024.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7845460

Citation

Zuckerman, B, et al. "Inhibition of Giant-planet Formation By Rapid Gas Depletion Around Young Stars." Nature, vol. 373, no. 6514, 1995, pp. 494-6.
Zuckerman B, Forveille T, Kastner JH. Inhibition of giant-planet formation by rapid gas depletion around young stars. Nature. 1995;373(6514):494-6.
Zuckerman, B., Forveille, T., & Kastner, J. H. (1995). Inhibition of giant-planet formation by rapid gas depletion around young stars. Nature, 373(6514), pp. 494-6.
Zuckerman B, Forveille T, Kastner JH. Inhibition of Giant-planet Formation By Rapid Gas Depletion Around Young Stars. Nature. 1995 Feb 9;373(6514):494-6. PubMed PMID: 7845460.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Inhibition of giant-planet formation by rapid gas depletion around young stars. AU - Zuckerman,B, AU - Forveille,T, AU - Kastner,J H, PY - 1995/2/9/pubmed PY - 1995/2/9/medline PY - 1995/2/9/entrez SP - 494 EP - 6 JF - Nature JO - Nature VL - 373 IS - 6514 N2 - Although stars form from clouds of gas and dust, there are insignificant amounts of gas around ordinary (Sun-like) stars. This suggests that hydrogen and helium, the primary constituents of planets such as Jupiter and Saturn, are not easily retained in orbit as a star matures. The gas-giant planets in the Solar System must therefore have formed rapidly. Models of their formation generally suggest that a solid core formed in < or = 10(6) yr, followed by the accretion of the massive gaseous envelope in approximately 10(7) yr (refs 1-5). But how and when the gas of the solar nebula dissipated, and how this compares with the predicted timescale of gas-giant formation, remains unclear, in part because direct observations of circumstellar gas have been made only for stars either younger or older than the critical range of 10(6)-10(7) yr (refs 8-15). Here we report observations of the molecular gas surrounding 20 stars whose ages are likely to be in this range. The gas dissipates rapidly; after a few million years the mass remaining is typically much less than the mass of Jupiter. Thus, if gas-giant planets are common in the Galaxy, they must form even more quickly than present models suggest. SN - 0028-0836 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7845460/Inhibition_of_giant_planet_formation_by_rapid_gas_depletion_around_young_stars_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/373494a0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -