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Pudendal neuropathy in evacuatory disorders.
Dis Colon Rectum. 1995 Feb; 38(2):166-71.DC

Abstract

PURPOSE

Aims of the present study were to assess frequency of pudendal neuropathy in patients with constipation and fecal incontinence, to determine its correlation with clinical variables, anal electromyographic assessment, and anal manometric pressures, and to determine usefulness of the pudendal nerve terminal motor latency assessment in evaluation of these evacuatory disorders.

METHODS

From 1988 to 1993, 395 patients (constipated, 172; incontinent, 223) underwent pudendal nerve terminal motor latency, electromyography, and anal manometry. Pudendal neuropathy was defined as a pudendal nerve terminal motor latency greater than 2.2 ms.

RESULTS

Patients were a mean age of 60.7 (range, 17-88) years. Overall incidence of pudendal neuropathy was 31.4 percent (constipated, 23.8 percent; incontinent, 37.2 percent; P < 0.05). Incidence of pudendal neuropathy dramatically increased after 70 years of age in both groups (22 percent vs. 44 percent; P < 0.05). Moreover, subjects with pudendal neuropathy were older than those without pudendal neuropathy (mean age, 67 vs. 57 years; P < 0.05). The presence of pudendal neuropathy was associated with decreased motor unit potentials recruitment in patients with incontinence (P < 0.01). Patients with and without pudendal neuropathy had a similar mean squeezing pressure in both groups.

CONCLUSION

Pudendal neuropathy is an age-related phenomenon. Although pudendal neuropathy is associated with abnormal anal electromyographic findings in patients with incontinence, no association with anal manometric pressures was found. Pudendal nerve terminal motor latency assessment is a useful tool in the evaluation of patients with fecal incontinence, but its role in the assessment of constipated patients remains unknown.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Colorectal Surgery, Cleveland Clinic Florida, Fort Lauderdale.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7851171

Citation

Vaccaro, C A., et al. "Pudendal Neuropathy in Evacuatory Disorders." Diseases of the Colon and Rectum, vol. 38, no. 2, 1995, pp. 166-71.
Vaccaro CA, Cheong DM, Wexner SD, et al. Pudendal neuropathy in evacuatory disorders. Dis Colon Rectum. 1995;38(2):166-71.
Vaccaro, C. A., Cheong, D. M., Wexner, S. D., Nogueras, J. J., Salanga, V. D., Hanson, M. R., & Phillips, R. C. (1995). Pudendal neuropathy in evacuatory disorders. Diseases of the Colon and Rectum, 38(2), 166-71.
Vaccaro CA, et al. Pudendal Neuropathy in Evacuatory Disorders. Dis Colon Rectum. 1995;38(2):166-71. PubMed PMID: 7851171.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Pudendal neuropathy in evacuatory disorders. AU - Vaccaro,C A, AU - Cheong,D M, AU - Wexner,S D, AU - Nogueras,J J, AU - Salanga,V D, AU - Hanson,M R, AU - Phillips,R C, PY - 1995/2/1/pubmed PY - 1995/2/1/medline PY - 1995/2/1/entrez SP - 166 EP - 71 JF - Diseases of the colon and rectum JO - Dis Colon Rectum VL - 38 IS - 2 N2 - PURPOSE: Aims of the present study were to assess frequency of pudendal neuropathy in patients with constipation and fecal incontinence, to determine its correlation with clinical variables, anal electromyographic assessment, and anal manometric pressures, and to determine usefulness of the pudendal nerve terminal motor latency assessment in evaluation of these evacuatory disorders. METHODS: From 1988 to 1993, 395 patients (constipated, 172; incontinent, 223) underwent pudendal nerve terminal motor latency, electromyography, and anal manometry. Pudendal neuropathy was defined as a pudendal nerve terminal motor latency greater than 2.2 ms. RESULTS: Patients were a mean age of 60.7 (range, 17-88) years. Overall incidence of pudendal neuropathy was 31.4 percent (constipated, 23.8 percent; incontinent, 37.2 percent; P < 0.05). Incidence of pudendal neuropathy dramatically increased after 70 years of age in both groups (22 percent vs. 44 percent; P < 0.05). Moreover, subjects with pudendal neuropathy were older than those without pudendal neuropathy (mean age, 67 vs. 57 years; P < 0.05). The presence of pudendal neuropathy was associated with decreased motor unit potentials recruitment in patients with incontinence (P < 0.01). Patients with and without pudendal neuropathy had a similar mean squeezing pressure in both groups. CONCLUSION: Pudendal neuropathy is an age-related phenomenon. Although pudendal neuropathy is associated with abnormal anal electromyographic findings in patients with incontinence, no association with anal manometric pressures was found. Pudendal nerve terminal motor latency assessment is a useful tool in the evaluation of patients with fecal incontinence, but its role in the assessment of constipated patients remains unknown. SN - 0012-3706 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7851171/Pudendal_neuropathy_in_evacuatory_disorders_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&amp;PAGE=linkout&amp;SEARCH=7851171.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -