Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Swimming and the risk of cutaneous melanoma.

Abstract

Recreational exposure to the sun may not explain fully current trends in melanoma incidence. The hypothesis was examined whether carcinogens in water play a role in the development of cutaneous melanoma. In a case-control study, 128 melanoma patients and 168 patients with other types of malignancy completed a detailed questionnaire on aquatic leisure time activities. All relative risk estimates were adjusted for age, gender, educational level, pigmentation characteristics, and exposure to sun habits. Regular swimming during the summer months in swimming pools and in open waters such as rivers and seas before the age of 15 years, was associated with odds ratios of 2.20 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.05-4.62) and 2.41 (95% CI, 1.04-5.58), respectively, compared with no swimming at all or swimming in relatively unpolluted waters, such as lakes and fens. Melanoma patients learned to swim at a younger age; compared with those who never learned to swim or who learned to swim after the age of 12 years, the odds ratio was 1.87 (95% CI, 0.91-3.78) for those who learned to swim at ages 9-12 years, and 2.22 (95% CI, 1.16-4.26) for those who learned to swim before 9 years of age. Compared with persons who had no swimming certificates, an odds ratio of 1.25 (95% CI, 0.71-2.23) was found for persons with one or two certificates, and an odds ratio of 2.96 (95% CI, 1.25-6.96) for persons with three or more certificates. The positive association between a history of swimming and melanoma risk suggests that carcinogenic agents in water, possibly chlorination by products, play a role in melanoma aetiology.

Links

  • Aggregator Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Medical Informatics and Epidemiology, University of Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

    , , , ,

    Source

    Melanoma research 4:5 1994 Oct pg 281-6

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Adult
    Aged
    Carcinogens, Environmental
    Case-Control Studies
    Child
    Child, Preschool
    Chlorine
    Cocarcinogenesis
    Comorbidity
    Female
    Fresh Water
    Heliotherapy
    Humans
    Male
    Melanoma
    Middle Aged
    Neoplasms
    Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced
    Netherlands
    Nevus, Pigmented
    Odds Ratio
    Risk
    Risk Factors
    Seasons
    Skin Neoplasms
    Skin Pigmentation
    Sunlight
    Swimming
    Swimming Pools
    Water Pollutants

    Pub Type(s)

    Comparative Study
    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    7858410

    Citation

    Nelemans, P J., et al. "Swimming and the Risk of Cutaneous Melanoma." Melanoma Research, vol. 4, no. 5, 1994, pp. 281-6.
    Nelemans PJ, Rampen FH, Groenendal H, et al. Swimming and the risk of cutaneous melanoma. Melanoma Res. 1994;4(5):281-6.
    Nelemans, P. J., Rampen, F. H., Groenendal, H., Kiemeney, L. A., Ruiter, D. J., & Verbeek, A. L. (1994). Swimming and the risk of cutaneous melanoma. Melanoma Research, 4(5), pp. 281-6.
    Nelemans PJ, et al. Swimming and the Risk of Cutaneous Melanoma. Melanoma Res. 1994;4(5):281-6. PubMed PMID: 7858410.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Swimming and the risk of cutaneous melanoma. AU - Nelemans,P J, AU - Rampen,F H, AU - Groenendal,H, AU - Kiemeney,L A, AU - Ruiter,D J, AU - Verbeek,A L, PY - 1994/10/1/pubmed PY - 1994/10/1/medline PY - 1994/10/1/entrez SP - 281 EP - 6 JF - Melanoma research JO - Melanoma Res. VL - 4 IS - 5 N2 - Recreational exposure to the sun may not explain fully current trends in melanoma incidence. The hypothesis was examined whether carcinogens in water play a role in the development of cutaneous melanoma. In a case-control study, 128 melanoma patients and 168 patients with other types of malignancy completed a detailed questionnaire on aquatic leisure time activities. All relative risk estimates were adjusted for age, gender, educational level, pigmentation characteristics, and exposure to sun habits. Regular swimming during the summer months in swimming pools and in open waters such as rivers and seas before the age of 15 years, was associated with odds ratios of 2.20 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.05-4.62) and 2.41 (95% CI, 1.04-5.58), respectively, compared with no swimming at all or swimming in relatively unpolluted waters, such as lakes and fens. Melanoma patients learned to swim at a younger age; compared with those who never learned to swim or who learned to swim after the age of 12 years, the odds ratio was 1.87 (95% CI, 0.91-3.78) for those who learned to swim at ages 9-12 years, and 2.22 (95% CI, 1.16-4.26) for those who learned to swim before 9 years of age. Compared with persons who had no swimming certificates, an odds ratio of 1.25 (95% CI, 0.71-2.23) was found for persons with one or two certificates, and an odds ratio of 2.96 (95% CI, 1.25-6.96) for persons with three or more certificates. The positive association between a history of swimming and melanoma risk suggests that carcinogenic agents in water, possibly chlorination by products, play a role in melanoma aetiology. SN - 0960-8931 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7858410/Swimming_and_the_risk_of_cutaneous_melanoma_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=7858410.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -