Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Lactose and galactose intake and metabolism in relation to the risk of epithelial ovarian cancer.
Am J Epidemiol. 1995 Mar 01; 141(5):407-16.AJ

Abstract

It has been suggested that aspects of lactose consumption and metabolism favoring a relatively high tissue level of galactose-1-phosphate may predispose women to ovarian cancer. The authors sought to examine this hypothesis in a study of 108 18- to 74-year-old Caucasian residents of a three-county area of western Washington who were diagnosed with stage I ovarian cancer during 1989-1991, and 108 age- and race-matched controls. Lactose and galactose intake, measured using a food frequency questionnaire, had been hypothesized to increase risk, but were somewhat lower among the cases than among the controls (75th percentile of lactose intake vs. 25th: odds ratio (OR) = 0.80, 95% confidence interval (Cl) 0.52-1.2; of galactose intake: OR = 0.71, 95% Cl 0.48-1.1). Intestinal lactase activity, also hypothesized to have a positive relation with ovarian cancer occurrence, was measured with an oral lactose challenge followed by determination of urinary galactose; no evidence that it was related to the disease was found (75th percentile of excreted galactose vs. 25th: OR = 0.87, 95% Cl 0.62-1.2). Galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (transferase), the enzyme responsible for the metabolism of galactose-1-phosphate, was measured in erythrocytes; no deficit in cases was observed (75th percentile of transferase activity vs. 25th: OR = 1.3, 95% Cl 0.80-2.1). There was also no excess of cases carrying low-activity genetic variants of the transferase enzyme (lower-activity variants vs. higher-activity variants: OR = 0.61, 95% Cl 0.21-1.7). These results do not support the hypothesis that aspects of lactose and galactose intake and metabolism have a bearing on the etiology of ovarian cancer.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7879785

Citation

Herrinton, L J., et al. "Lactose and Galactose Intake and Metabolism in Relation to the Risk of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer." American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 141, no. 5, 1995, pp. 407-16.
Herrinton LJ, Weiss NS, Beresford SA, et al. Lactose and galactose intake and metabolism in relation to the risk of epithelial ovarian cancer. Am J Epidemiol. 1995;141(5):407-16.
Herrinton, L. J., Weiss, N. S., Beresford, S. A., Stanford, J. L., Wolfla, D. M., Feng, Z., & Scott, C. R. (1995). Lactose and galactose intake and metabolism in relation to the risk of epithelial ovarian cancer. American Journal of Epidemiology, 141(5), 407-16.
Herrinton LJ, et al. Lactose and Galactose Intake and Metabolism in Relation to the Risk of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer. Am J Epidemiol. 1995 Mar 1;141(5):407-16. PubMed PMID: 7879785.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lactose and galactose intake and metabolism in relation to the risk of epithelial ovarian cancer. AU - Herrinton,L J, AU - Weiss,N S, AU - Beresford,S A, AU - Stanford,J L, AU - Wolfla,D M, AU - Feng,Z, AU - Scott,C R, PY - 1995/3/1/pubmed PY - 1995/3/1/medline PY - 1995/3/1/entrez SP - 407 EP - 16 JF - American journal of epidemiology JO - Am J Epidemiol VL - 141 IS - 5 N2 - It has been suggested that aspects of lactose consumption and metabolism favoring a relatively high tissue level of galactose-1-phosphate may predispose women to ovarian cancer. The authors sought to examine this hypothesis in a study of 108 18- to 74-year-old Caucasian residents of a three-county area of western Washington who were diagnosed with stage I ovarian cancer during 1989-1991, and 108 age- and race-matched controls. Lactose and galactose intake, measured using a food frequency questionnaire, had been hypothesized to increase risk, but were somewhat lower among the cases than among the controls (75th percentile of lactose intake vs. 25th: odds ratio (OR) = 0.80, 95% confidence interval (Cl) 0.52-1.2; of galactose intake: OR = 0.71, 95% Cl 0.48-1.1). Intestinal lactase activity, also hypothesized to have a positive relation with ovarian cancer occurrence, was measured with an oral lactose challenge followed by determination of urinary galactose; no evidence that it was related to the disease was found (75th percentile of excreted galactose vs. 25th: OR = 0.87, 95% Cl 0.62-1.2). Galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (transferase), the enzyme responsible for the metabolism of galactose-1-phosphate, was measured in erythrocytes; no deficit in cases was observed (75th percentile of transferase activity vs. 25th: OR = 1.3, 95% Cl 0.80-2.1). There was also no excess of cases carrying low-activity genetic variants of the transferase enzyme (lower-activity variants vs. higher-activity variants: OR = 0.61, 95% Cl 0.21-1.7). These results do not support the hypothesis that aspects of lactose and galactose intake and metabolism have a bearing on the etiology of ovarian cancer. SN - 0002-9262 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7879785/Lactose_and_galactose_intake_and_metabolism_in_relation_to_the_risk_of_epithelial_ovarian_cancer_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/aje/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/oxfordjournals.aje.a117443 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -