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The role of parkinsonism and antiparkinsonian therapy in the subsequent development of tardive dyskinesia.
Ann Clin Psychiatry. 1994 Sep; 6(3):197-203.AC

Abstract

Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is a side effect of prolonged neuroleptic treatment presenting as abnormal involuntary movements. This troublesome disorder occurs in only 15-30% of patients taking neuroleptics, suggesting that these individuals may be physiologically distinct so as to be predisposed. This study analyzed possible factors contributing to TD development. Fifty patients on depot neuroleptics for more than 7.1 years were prospectively examined for TD and drug-induced parkinsonism (DIP) using the Smith-Trims rating scale for an average of 5 years. The patients were assessed for the severity of the movement and if the movement increased or decreased with respect to neuroleptic dosage, anticholinergic dosage, parkinsonism, and other related factors. Both TD and DIP increased over time. In the patients whose dose of neuroleptic decreased, the increase in TD ratings was not significant. Using a forward stepwise regression DIP was found to increase as TD worsened but did not appear to predict subsequent TD development. Anticholinergic treatment showed a less significant correlation with the change in TD. These results have implications for the management of combined TD and DIP presentation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Kentucky 40292.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7881501

Citation

Elliott, K J., et al. "The Role of Parkinsonism and Antiparkinsonian Therapy in the Subsequent Development of Tardive Dyskinesia." Annals of Clinical Psychiatry : Official Journal of the American Academy of Clinical Psychiatrists, vol. 6, no. 3, 1994, pp. 197-203.
Elliott KJ, Lewis S, el-Mallakh RS, et al. The role of parkinsonism and antiparkinsonian therapy in the subsequent development of tardive dyskinesia. Ann Clin Psychiatry. 1994;6(3):197-203.
Elliott, K. J., Lewis, S., el-Mallakh, R. S., Looney, S. W., Caudill, R., & Bacani-Oropilla, T. (1994). The role of parkinsonism and antiparkinsonian therapy in the subsequent development of tardive dyskinesia. Annals of Clinical Psychiatry : Official Journal of the American Academy of Clinical Psychiatrists, 6(3), 197-203.
Elliott KJ, et al. The Role of Parkinsonism and Antiparkinsonian Therapy in the Subsequent Development of Tardive Dyskinesia. Ann Clin Psychiatry. 1994;6(3):197-203. PubMed PMID: 7881501.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The role of parkinsonism and antiparkinsonian therapy in the subsequent development of tardive dyskinesia. AU - Elliott,K J, AU - Lewis,S, AU - el-Mallakh,R S, AU - Looney,S W, AU - Caudill,R, AU - Bacani-Oropilla,T, PY - 1994/9/1/pubmed PY - 1994/9/1/medline PY - 1994/9/1/entrez SP - 197 EP - 203 JF - Annals of clinical psychiatry : official journal of the American Academy of Clinical Psychiatrists JO - Ann Clin Psychiatry VL - 6 IS - 3 N2 - Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is a side effect of prolonged neuroleptic treatment presenting as abnormal involuntary movements. This troublesome disorder occurs in only 15-30% of patients taking neuroleptics, suggesting that these individuals may be physiologically distinct so as to be predisposed. This study analyzed possible factors contributing to TD development. Fifty patients on depot neuroleptics for more than 7.1 years were prospectively examined for TD and drug-induced parkinsonism (DIP) using the Smith-Trims rating scale for an average of 5 years. The patients were assessed for the severity of the movement and if the movement increased or decreased with respect to neuroleptic dosage, anticholinergic dosage, parkinsonism, and other related factors. Both TD and DIP increased over time. In the patients whose dose of neuroleptic decreased, the increase in TD ratings was not significant. Using a forward stepwise regression DIP was found to increase as TD worsened but did not appear to predict subsequent TD development. Anticholinergic treatment showed a less significant correlation with the change in TD. These results have implications for the management of combined TD and DIP presentation. SN - 1040-1237 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7881501/The_role_of_parkinsonism_and_antiparkinsonian_therapy_in_the_subsequent_development_of_tardive_dyskinesia_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/6999 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -