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Postprandial lipoprotein lipase, insulin and gastric inhibitory polypeptide responses to test meals of different fatty acid composition: comparison of saturated, n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1994 Dec; 48(12):849-58.EJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The present study was carried out to investigate effects of meals, rich in either saturated fatty acids (SFA), or n-6 or n-3 fatty acids, on postprandial plasma lipid and hormone concentrations as well as post-heparin plasma lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity.

DESIGN

The study was a randomized single-blind study comparing responses to three test meals.

SETTING

The volunteers attended the Clinical Investigation Unit of the Royal Surrey County Hospital on three separate occasions in order to consume the meals.

SUBJECTS

Twelve male volunteers with an average age of 22.5 +/- 1.4 years (mean +/- SD), were selected from the University of Surrey student population; one subject dropped out of the study because he found the test meal unpalatable.

INTERVENTIONS

Three meals were given in the early evening and postprandial responses were followed overnight for 11h. The oils used to prepare each of the three test meals were: a mixed oil rich in saturated fatty acids (SFA) which mimicked the fatty acid composition of the current UK diet, corn oil, rich in n-6 fatty acids and a fish oil concentrate (MaxEPA) rich in n-3 fatty acids. The oil under investigation (40 g) was incorporated into the test meals which were otherwise identical [208 g carbohydrates, 35 g protein, 5.65 MJ (1350 kcal) energy]. Postprandial plasma triacylglycerol (TAG), gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP), and insulin responses, as well as post-heparin LPL activity (measured at 12 h postprandially only) were investigated.

RESULTS

Fatty acids of the n-3 series significantly reduced plasma TAG responses compared to the mixed oil meal (P < 0.05) and increased post-heparin LPL activity 15 min after the injection of heparin (P < 0.01). A biphasic response was observed in TAG, with peak responses occurring at 1 h and between 3-7 h postprandially. GIP and insulin showed similar responses to the three test meals and no significant differences were observed.

CONCLUSION

We conclude that fish oils can decrease postprandial plasma TAG levels partly through an increase in post-heparin LPL activity, which however, is not due to increased GIP or insulin concentrations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Nutritional Metabolism Research Group, School of Biological Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7889893

Citation

Zampelas, A, et al. "Postprandial Lipoprotein Lipase, Insulin and Gastric Inhibitory Polypeptide Responses to Test Meals of Different Fatty Acid Composition: Comparison of Saturated, N-6 and N-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids." European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 48, no. 12, 1994, pp. 849-58.
Zampelas A, Murphy M, Morgan LM, et al. Postprandial lipoprotein lipase, insulin and gastric inhibitory polypeptide responses to test meals of different fatty acid composition: comparison of saturated, n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Eur J Clin Nutr. 1994;48(12):849-58.
Zampelas, A., Murphy, M., Morgan, L. M., & Williams, C. M. (1994). Postprandial lipoprotein lipase, insulin and gastric inhibitory polypeptide responses to test meals of different fatty acid composition: comparison of saturated, n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 48(12), 849-58.
Zampelas A, et al. Postprandial Lipoprotein Lipase, Insulin and Gastric Inhibitory Polypeptide Responses to Test Meals of Different Fatty Acid Composition: Comparison of Saturated, N-6 and N-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids. Eur J Clin Nutr. 1994;48(12):849-58. PubMed PMID: 7889893.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Postprandial lipoprotein lipase, insulin and gastric inhibitory polypeptide responses to test meals of different fatty acid composition: comparison of saturated, n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. AU - Zampelas,A, AU - Murphy,M, AU - Morgan,L M, AU - Williams,C M, PY - 1994/12/1/pubmed PY - 1994/12/1/medline PY - 1994/12/1/entrez SP - 849 EP - 58 JF - European journal of clinical nutrition JO - Eur J Clin Nutr VL - 48 IS - 12 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The present study was carried out to investigate effects of meals, rich in either saturated fatty acids (SFA), or n-6 or n-3 fatty acids, on postprandial plasma lipid and hormone concentrations as well as post-heparin plasma lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity. DESIGN: The study was a randomized single-blind study comparing responses to three test meals. SETTING: The volunteers attended the Clinical Investigation Unit of the Royal Surrey County Hospital on three separate occasions in order to consume the meals. SUBJECTS: Twelve male volunteers with an average age of 22.5 +/- 1.4 years (mean +/- SD), were selected from the University of Surrey student population; one subject dropped out of the study because he found the test meal unpalatable. INTERVENTIONS: Three meals were given in the early evening and postprandial responses were followed overnight for 11h. The oils used to prepare each of the three test meals were: a mixed oil rich in saturated fatty acids (SFA) which mimicked the fatty acid composition of the current UK diet, corn oil, rich in n-6 fatty acids and a fish oil concentrate (MaxEPA) rich in n-3 fatty acids. The oil under investigation (40 g) was incorporated into the test meals which were otherwise identical [208 g carbohydrates, 35 g protein, 5.65 MJ (1350 kcal) energy]. Postprandial plasma triacylglycerol (TAG), gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP), and insulin responses, as well as post-heparin LPL activity (measured at 12 h postprandially only) were investigated. RESULTS: Fatty acids of the n-3 series significantly reduced plasma TAG responses compared to the mixed oil meal (P < 0.05) and increased post-heparin LPL activity 15 min after the injection of heparin (P < 0.01). A biphasic response was observed in TAG, with peak responses occurring at 1 h and between 3-7 h postprandially. GIP and insulin showed similar responses to the three test meals and no significant differences were observed. CONCLUSION: We conclude that fish oils can decrease postprandial plasma TAG levels partly through an increase in post-heparin LPL activity, which however, is not due to increased GIP or insulin concentrations. SN - 0954-3007 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7889893/Postprandial_lipoprotein_lipase_insulin_and_gastric_inhibitory_polypeptide_responses_to_test_meals_of_different_fatty_acid_composition:_comparison_of_saturated_n_6_and_n_3_polyunsaturated_fatty_acids_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/diabetesmedicines.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -