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Lipoprotein metabolism in postmenopausal and oophorectomized women.
Obstet Gynecol. 1995 Apr; 85(4):523-8.OG

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate the mechanisms of accumulating cholesterol, and to analyze the metabolism of excess tissue cholesterol in women with low plasma levels of sex steroid hormones.

METHODS

We measured plasma concentrations of cholesterol, triglyceride, apolipoproteins, sex steroid hormones, and lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase activity in 20 premenopausal, ten postmenopausal, and ten bilaterally oophorectomized women. Lipoprotein lipase and hepatic triglyceride lipase activities were measured in postheparin plasma. We compared the three groups and evaluated a correlation between lipid metabolism and sex steroid hormone concentrations.

RESULTS

The mean plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol level, lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase activity, and postheparin plasma lipoprotein lipase activity were higher in the postmenopausal and surgically menopausal groups. The mean plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentration and postheparin plasma hepatic triglyceride lipase activity did not differ significantly among the three groups. The plasma LDL cholesterol level and postheparin plasma lipoprotein lipase activity showed a significantly negative correlation with plasma concentration of estrone (LDL: r = 0.64, P < .001; lipoprotein lipase: r = 0.54, P < .005) and estradiol (LDL: r = 0.65, P < .001; lipoprotein lipase: r = 0.47, P < .01), but not with that of testosterone. There was no significant relationship between postheparin plasma hepatic triglyceride lipase activity and plasma sex steroid hormones. Plasma lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase activity correlated significantly with plasma LDL cholesterol concentration, but not with levels of sex steroid hormones.

CONCLUSION

Because of low endogenous estrogens, enhanced postheparin plasma lipoprotein lipase activity may lead to an elevated plasma LDL cholesterol concentration in postmenopausal and bilaterally oophorectomized women. We demonstrated an accelerated cholesterol esterification in HDL cholesterol that may have been induced by LDL cholesterol accumulation, although the HDL cholesterol concentration remained unchanged.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kochi Medical School, Japan.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7898827

Citation

Wakatsuki, A, and Y Sagara. "Lipoprotein Metabolism in Postmenopausal and Oophorectomized Women." Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 85, no. 4, 1995, pp. 523-8.
Wakatsuki A, Sagara Y. Lipoprotein metabolism in postmenopausal and oophorectomized women. Obstet Gynecol. 1995;85(4):523-8.
Wakatsuki, A., & Sagara, Y. (1995). Lipoprotein metabolism in postmenopausal and oophorectomized women. Obstetrics and Gynecology, 85(4), 523-8.
Wakatsuki A, Sagara Y. Lipoprotein Metabolism in Postmenopausal and Oophorectomized Women. Obstet Gynecol. 1995;85(4):523-8. PubMed PMID: 7898827.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lipoprotein metabolism in postmenopausal and oophorectomized women. AU - Wakatsuki,A, AU - Sagara,Y, PY - 1995/4/1/pubmed PY - 1995/4/1/medline PY - 1995/4/1/entrez SP - 523 EP - 8 JF - Obstetrics and gynecology JO - Obstet Gynecol VL - 85 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To investigate the mechanisms of accumulating cholesterol, and to analyze the metabolism of excess tissue cholesterol in women with low plasma levels of sex steroid hormones. METHODS: We measured plasma concentrations of cholesterol, triglyceride, apolipoproteins, sex steroid hormones, and lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase activity in 20 premenopausal, ten postmenopausal, and ten bilaterally oophorectomized women. Lipoprotein lipase and hepatic triglyceride lipase activities were measured in postheparin plasma. We compared the three groups and evaluated a correlation between lipid metabolism and sex steroid hormone concentrations. RESULTS: The mean plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol level, lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase activity, and postheparin plasma lipoprotein lipase activity were higher in the postmenopausal and surgically menopausal groups. The mean plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentration and postheparin plasma hepatic triglyceride lipase activity did not differ significantly among the three groups. The plasma LDL cholesterol level and postheparin plasma lipoprotein lipase activity showed a significantly negative correlation with plasma concentration of estrone (LDL: r = 0.64, P < .001; lipoprotein lipase: r = 0.54, P < .005) and estradiol (LDL: r = 0.65, P < .001; lipoprotein lipase: r = 0.47, P < .01), but not with that of testosterone. There was no significant relationship between postheparin plasma hepatic triglyceride lipase activity and plasma sex steroid hormones. Plasma lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase activity correlated significantly with plasma LDL cholesterol concentration, but not with levels of sex steroid hormones. CONCLUSION: Because of low endogenous estrogens, enhanced postheparin plasma lipoprotein lipase activity may lead to an elevated plasma LDL cholesterol concentration in postmenopausal and bilaterally oophorectomized women. We demonstrated an accelerated cholesterol esterification in HDL cholesterol that may have been induced by LDL cholesterol accumulation, although the HDL cholesterol concentration remained unchanged. SN - 0029-7844 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7898827/Lipoprotein_metabolism_in_postmenopausal_and_oophorectomized_women_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/0029-7844(94)00452-J DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -