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Energy expenditure and fluid production in hyperbaric He-O2 environments using doubly labeled water.
Undersea Hyperb Med 1994; 21(2):199-208UH

Abstract

Energy expenditure (EE), carbon dioxide production (rCO2), water turnover (rH2O), and urine production (UP) were measured to determine nutrient requirements of U.S. Navy divers during saturation dives. Parameters were measured in a normal surface environment (n = 10) and in 0.56 MPa (n = 9) and 3.17 MPa (n = 11) helium-oxygen environments. Daily EE, rCO2, and rH2O were measured with the doubly labeled water method for 10-14 days in each environment. Daily UP was determined by 24-h urine collection for 5- to 10-day periods in each environment. Divers consumed a mixed diet composed of 30% calories from fat, 15% protein, and 55% carbohydrate. Both EE and rCO2 increased significantly relative to surface conditions at 0.56 MPa (13 +/- 4% and 11 +/- 4%) and 3.17 MPa (14 +/- 4% and 11 +/- 3%), but there was no difference between dives. Water turnover was not significantly affected by the hyperbaric environment. UP was significantly greater than surface conditions at 0.56 MPa (53 +/- 19%) but not at 3.17 MPa (38 +/- 18%). Increased EE is attributed to thermal stress caused by the helium-oxygen environment. Increased UP may have been caused by decreased evaporative water loss.

Authors+Show Affiliations

U.S. Department of Agriculture, Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center, Maryland.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7914783

Citation

Seale, J L., et al. "Energy Expenditure and Fluid Production in Hyperbaric He-O2 Environments Using Doubly Labeled Water." Undersea & Hyperbaric Medicine : Journal of the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc, vol. 21, no. 2, 1994, pp. 199-208.
Seale JL, Thorp JW, Conway JM, et al. Energy expenditure and fluid production in hyperbaric He-O2 environments using doubly labeled water. Undersea Hyperb Med. 1994;21(2):199-208.
Seale, J. L., Thorp, J. W., Conway, J. M., Rumpler, W. V., & Haberman, K. J. (1994). Energy expenditure and fluid production in hyperbaric He-O2 environments using doubly labeled water. Undersea & Hyperbaric Medicine : Journal of the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc, 21(2), pp. 199-208.
Seale JL, et al. Energy Expenditure and Fluid Production in Hyperbaric He-O2 Environments Using Doubly Labeled Water. Undersea Hyperb Med. 1994;21(2):199-208. PubMed PMID: 7914783.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Energy expenditure and fluid production in hyperbaric He-O2 environments using doubly labeled water. AU - Seale,J L, AU - Thorp,J W, AU - Conway,J M, AU - Rumpler,W V, AU - Haberman,K J, PY - 1994/6/1/pubmed PY - 1994/6/1/medline PY - 1994/6/1/entrez SP - 199 EP - 208 JF - Undersea & hyperbaric medicine : journal of the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc JO - Undersea Hyperb Med VL - 21 IS - 2 N2 - Energy expenditure (EE), carbon dioxide production (rCO2), water turnover (rH2O), and urine production (UP) were measured to determine nutrient requirements of U.S. Navy divers during saturation dives. Parameters were measured in a normal surface environment (n = 10) and in 0.56 MPa (n = 9) and 3.17 MPa (n = 11) helium-oxygen environments. Daily EE, rCO2, and rH2O were measured with the doubly labeled water method for 10-14 days in each environment. Daily UP was determined by 24-h urine collection for 5- to 10-day periods in each environment. Divers consumed a mixed diet composed of 30% calories from fat, 15% protein, and 55% carbohydrate. Both EE and rCO2 increased significantly relative to surface conditions at 0.56 MPa (13 +/- 4% and 11 +/- 4%) and 3.17 MPa (14 +/- 4% and 11 +/- 3%), but there was no difference between dives. Water turnover was not significantly affected by the hyperbaric environment. UP was significantly greater than surface conditions at 0.56 MPa (53 +/- 19%) but not at 3.17 MPa (38 +/- 18%). Increased EE is attributed to thermal stress caused by the helium-oxygen environment. Increased UP may have been caused by decreased evaporative water loss. SN - 1066-2936 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7914783/Energy_expenditure_and_fluid_production_in_hyperbaric_He_O2_environments_using_doubly_labeled_water_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/urineandurination.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -