Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Serum cholesterol concentration and mortality from accidents, suicide, and other violent causes.
BMJ. 1994 Aug 13; 309(6952):445-7.BMJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To study the association of mortality from accidents, suicides, and other violent deaths with serum cholesterol concentration.

DESIGN

Baseline measurements in two randomly chosen independent cohorts were carried out in 1972 and 1977. Mortality was monitored over 10-15 years through the national death registry.

SETTING

Eastern Finland.

SUBJECTS

The two cohorts comprised men (n = 10,898) and women (n = 11,534) born between 1913 and 1947. There were 193 deaths due to accidents, suicides, and violence among men and 43 among women.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE

Mortality from accidents, suicides, and other violent deaths was used as the end point. Deaths from these causes were pooled together in the analyses.

RESULTS

Serum cholesterol concentration was not associated with mortality from accidents, suicides, and other violent deaths in the univariate analyses or in the proportional hazards regression analyses including smoking, systolic blood pressure, alcohol drinking, and education. In both genders smoking was more prevalent among those who died from accidents, suicides, and other violent causes than from other causes. Frequent use of alcohol increased mortality from these causes.

CONCLUSION

The risk of accidents, suicides, and other violent deaths was not related to serum cholesterol concentration, whereas such deaths were more prevalent in smokers and alcohol drinkers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7920128

Citation

Vartiainen, E, et al. "Serum Cholesterol Concentration and Mortality From Accidents, Suicide, and Other Violent Causes." BMJ (Clinical Research Ed.), vol. 309, no. 6952, 1994, pp. 445-7.
Vartiainen E, Puska P, Pekkanen J, et al. Serum cholesterol concentration and mortality from accidents, suicide, and other violent causes. BMJ. 1994;309(6952):445-7.
Vartiainen, E., Puska, P., Pekkanen, J., Tuomilehto, J., Lönnqvist, J., & Ehnholm, C. (1994). Serum cholesterol concentration and mortality from accidents, suicide, and other violent causes. BMJ (Clinical Research Ed.), 309(6952), 445-7.
Vartiainen E, et al. Serum Cholesterol Concentration and Mortality From Accidents, Suicide, and Other Violent Causes. BMJ. 1994 Aug 13;309(6952):445-7. PubMed PMID: 7920128.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Serum cholesterol concentration and mortality from accidents, suicide, and other violent causes. AU - Vartiainen,E, AU - Puska,P, AU - Pekkanen,J, AU - Tuomilehto,J, AU - Lönnqvist,J, AU - Ehnholm,C, PY - 1994/8/13/pubmed PY - 1994/8/13/medline PY - 1994/8/13/entrez SP - 445 EP - 7 JF - BMJ (Clinical research ed.) JO - BMJ VL - 309 IS - 6952 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To study the association of mortality from accidents, suicides, and other violent deaths with serum cholesterol concentration. DESIGN: Baseline measurements in two randomly chosen independent cohorts were carried out in 1972 and 1977. Mortality was monitored over 10-15 years through the national death registry. SETTING: Eastern Finland. SUBJECTS: The two cohorts comprised men (n = 10,898) and women (n = 11,534) born between 1913 and 1947. There were 193 deaths due to accidents, suicides, and violence among men and 43 among women. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Mortality from accidents, suicides, and other violent deaths was used as the end point. Deaths from these causes were pooled together in the analyses. RESULTS: Serum cholesterol concentration was not associated with mortality from accidents, suicides, and other violent deaths in the univariate analyses or in the proportional hazards regression analyses including smoking, systolic blood pressure, alcohol drinking, and education. In both genders smoking was more prevalent among those who died from accidents, suicides, and other violent causes than from other causes. Frequent use of alcohol increased mortality from these causes. CONCLUSION: The risk of accidents, suicides, and other violent deaths was not related to serum cholesterol concentration, whereas such deaths were more prevalent in smokers and alcohol drinkers. SN - 0959-8138 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7920128/Serum_cholesterol_concentration_and_mortality_from_accidents_suicide_and_other_violent_causes_ L2 - https://www.bmj.com/lookup/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=7920128 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -