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Medical therapy of colonic diverticular disease.
Postgrad Med. 1976 Dec; 60(6):107-9.PM

Abstract

Treatment of asymptomatic diverticulosis is geared to the prevention of constipation, with vigilance for possible signs of complications. A bulky stool decreases colonic intraluminal pressures, probably lessening pain and the chance of development of new diverticula. Increased stool weight may be achieved by the addition of vegetables, fruits, and cereals (bran) to the diet. Foods with undigestible residues should be avoided. When dietary manipulations are not well tolerated, hydrophilic bulk laxatives are a useful alternative. Treatment of acute attacks consists of bowel rest and administration of intravenous fluids and antibiotics. Side effects of anticholinergics may outweigh their questionable usefulness. Nonabsorable oral sulfonamides have little or no place in the treatment of the acute attack (peridiverticulitis).

Authors

No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

792840

Citation

Herrera, A F.. "Medical Therapy of Colonic Diverticular Disease." Postgraduate Medicine, vol. 60, no. 6, 1976, pp. 107-9.
Herrera AF. Medical therapy of colonic diverticular disease. Postgrad Med. 1976;60(6):107-9.
Herrera, A. F. (1976). Medical therapy of colonic diverticular disease. Postgraduate Medicine, 60(6), 107-9.
Herrera AF. Medical Therapy of Colonic Diverticular Disease. Postgrad Med. 1976;60(6):107-9. PubMed PMID: 792840.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Medical therapy of colonic diverticular disease. A1 - Herrera,A F, PY - 1976/12/1/pubmed PY - 1976/12/1/medline PY - 1976/12/1/entrez SP - 107 EP - 9 JF - Postgraduate medicine JO - Postgrad Med VL - 60 IS - 6 N2 - Treatment of asymptomatic diverticulosis is geared to the prevention of constipation, with vigilance for possible signs of complications. A bulky stool decreases colonic intraluminal pressures, probably lessening pain and the chance of development of new diverticula. Increased stool weight may be achieved by the addition of vegetables, fruits, and cereals (bran) to the diet. Foods with undigestible residues should be avoided. When dietary manipulations are not well tolerated, hydrophilic bulk laxatives are a useful alternative. Treatment of acute attacks consists of bowel rest and administration of intravenous fluids and antibiotics. Side effects of anticholinergics may outweigh their questionable usefulness. Nonabsorable oral sulfonamides have little or no place in the treatment of the acute attack (peridiverticulitis). SN - 0032-5481 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/792840/Medical_therapy_of_colonic_diverticular_disease_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00325481.1976.11708409 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -