Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH)-induced effects on sleep EEG and nocturnal secretion of growth hormone, cortisol and ACTH in patients with major depression.
J Psychiatr Res. 1994 May-Jun; 28(3):225-38.JP

Abstract

Studies in normal human subjects and animals suggest that the neuropeptide growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) is a common regulator of the sleep EEG and nocturnal hormone secretion. In healthy volunteers GHRH prompts an increase in the amount of slow wave sleep (SWS) and in growth hormone (GH) secretion and blunting of cortisol release. Inhibition of GHRH may contribute to sleep-endocrine aberrances during depression. We tested the effects of pulsatile application of 4 x 50 micrograms GHRH on the sleep EEG and simultaneously investigated nocturnal hormone secretion in 10 inpatients (four females, six males) with the acute episode of major depression. In contrast to the effects of placebo, GH secretion increased distinctly and rapid-eye-movement (REM) density decreased during the second half of night. No other significant changes in sleep-endocrine activity, including SWS, cortisol and ACTH secretion, could be observed. We assume that hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical system activity and slow wave sleep are inert to the influence of GHRH during acute depression. Cortisol and ACTH remained unchanged even in a subsample of five younger (aged 19-28 years) patients. This observation is in contrast to our recent finding that cortisol secretion is blunted in young normal volunteers after GHRH. But on the other hand, GHRH is capable of stimulating GH and inducing a decrease in REM density in these subjects.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry, Munich, Germany.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7932284

Citation

Steiger, A, et al. "Growth Hormone-releasing Hormone (GHRH)-induced Effects On Sleep EEG and Nocturnal Secretion of Growth Hormone, Cortisol and ACTH in Patients With Major Depression." Journal of Psychiatric Research, vol. 28, no. 3, 1994, pp. 225-38.
Steiger A, Guldner J, Colla-Müller M, et al. Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH)-induced effects on sleep EEG and nocturnal secretion of growth hormone, cortisol and ACTH in patients with major depression. J Psychiatr Res. 1994;28(3):225-38.
Steiger, A., Guldner, J., Colla-Müller, M., Friess, E., Sonntag, A., & Schier, T. (1994). Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH)-induced effects on sleep EEG and nocturnal secretion of growth hormone, cortisol and ACTH in patients with major depression. Journal of Psychiatric Research, 28(3), 225-38.
Steiger A, et al. Growth Hormone-releasing Hormone (GHRH)-induced Effects On Sleep EEG and Nocturnal Secretion of Growth Hormone, Cortisol and ACTH in Patients With Major Depression. J Psychiatr Res. 1994 May-Jun;28(3):225-38. PubMed PMID: 7932284.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH)-induced effects on sleep EEG and nocturnal secretion of growth hormone, cortisol and ACTH in patients with major depression. AU - Steiger,A, AU - Guldner,J, AU - Colla-Müller,M, AU - Friess,E, AU - Sonntag,A, AU - Schier,T, PY - 1994/5/1/pubmed PY - 1994/5/1/medline PY - 1994/5/1/entrez SP - 225 EP - 38 JF - Journal of psychiatric research JO - J Psychiatr Res VL - 28 IS - 3 N2 - Studies in normal human subjects and animals suggest that the neuropeptide growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) is a common regulator of the sleep EEG and nocturnal hormone secretion. In healthy volunteers GHRH prompts an increase in the amount of slow wave sleep (SWS) and in growth hormone (GH) secretion and blunting of cortisol release. Inhibition of GHRH may contribute to sleep-endocrine aberrances during depression. We tested the effects of pulsatile application of 4 x 50 micrograms GHRH on the sleep EEG and simultaneously investigated nocturnal hormone secretion in 10 inpatients (four females, six males) with the acute episode of major depression. In contrast to the effects of placebo, GH secretion increased distinctly and rapid-eye-movement (REM) density decreased during the second half of night. No other significant changes in sleep-endocrine activity, including SWS, cortisol and ACTH secretion, could be observed. We assume that hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical system activity and slow wave sleep are inert to the influence of GHRH during acute depression. Cortisol and ACTH remained unchanged even in a subsample of five younger (aged 19-28 years) patients. This observation is in contrast to our recent finding that cortisol secretion is blunted in young normal volunteers after GHRH. But on the other hand, GHRH is capable of stimulating GH and inducing a decrease in REM density in these subjects. SN - 0022-3956 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7932284/Growth_hormone_releasing_hormone__GHRH__induced_effects_on_sleep_EEG_and_nocturnal_secretion_of_growth_hormone_cortisol_and_ACTH_in_patients_with_major_depression_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/2199 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -