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Latex allergy: clinical features and cross-reactivity with fruits.
Ann Allergy. 1994 Oct; 73(4):309-14.AA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Latex IgE-mediated allergy is an important medical problem, but its clinical characteristics and association with food allergies are not well defined.

OBJECTIVE

Our objectives were to determine the clinical features of latex-allergic patients, and latex-associated food hypersensitivities.

METHODS

A prospective study was performed in our outpatient clinic. It consisted of a clinical questionnaire, skin prick tests with aeroallergens and foods, skin test with a latex extract, determination of total and specific IgE by CAP/RAST methods, and RAST inhibition. Latex and food allergies were diagnosed on the basis of a suggestive clinical history and a positive skin test with the corresponding allergen.

RESULTS

Twenty-five patients were diagnosed as having latex allergy. Their mean age was 33 +/- 9.0 years, with female predominance (23:2). There were nine greenhouse and six hospital workers. Latex-induced reactions included systemic anaphylaxis in nine patients (36%). Average total IgE was 161 kU/L, and it was within normal limits in 16 cases. Latex skin prick tests had excellent diagnostic precision with no adverse reactions, and CAP for latex diagnostic sensitivity was 80%. Forty-two food allergies were diagnosed in 13 of our patients (52%), and 23 of these consisted of systemic anaphylaxis. The most frequent food hypersensitivities were to avocado (9), chestnut (9), banana (7), kiwi (5) and papaya (3). Through RAST-inhibition, cross-reactivity among latex, avocado, chestnut, and banana was demonstrated.

CONCLUSIONS

In our experience, latex allergy affects middle-aged women in certain professions at increased risk. Our data suggest the existence of a "latex-fruit syndrome," because 52% of our latex allergic patients had allergies to certain fruits.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Sección de Alergia, Hospital Universitario Nuestra Sra. del Pino, Universidad de Las Palmas, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7943998

Citation

Blanco, C, et al. "Latex Allergy: Clinical Features and Cross-reactivity With Fruits." Annals of Allergy, vol. 73, no. 4, 1994, pp. 309-14.
Blanco C, Carrillo T, Castillo R, et al. Latex allergy: clinical features and cross-reactivity with fruits. Ann Allergy. 1994;73(4):309-14.
Blanco, C., Carrillo, T., Castillo, R., Quiralte, J., & Cuevas, M. (1994). Latex allergy: clinical features and cross-reactivity with fruits. Annals of Allergy, 73(4), 309-14.
Blanco C, et al. Latex Allergy: Clinical Features and Cross-reactivity With Fruits. Ann Allergy. 1994;73(4):309-14. PubMed PMID: 7943998.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Latex allergy: clinical features and cross-reactivity with fruits. AU - Blanco,C, AU - Carrillo,T, AU - Castillo,R, AU - Quiralte,J, AU - Cuevas,M, PY - 1994/10/1/pubmed PY - 1994/10/1/medline PY - 1994/10/1/entrez SP - 309 EP - 14 JF - Annals of allergy JO - Ann Allergy VL - 73 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Latex IgE-mediated allergy is an important medical problem, but its clinical characteristics and association with food allergies are not well defined. OBJECTIVE: Our objectives were to determine the clinical features of latex-allergic patients, and latex-associated food hypersensitivities. METHODS: A prospective study was performed in our outpatient clinic. It consisted of a clinical questionnaire, skin prick tests with aeroallergens and foods, skin test with a latex extract, determination of total and specific IgE by CAP/RAST methods, and RAST inhibition. Latex and food allergies were diagnosed on the basis of a suggestive clinical history and a positive skin test with the corresponding allergen. RESULTS: Twenty-five patients were diagnosed as having latex allergy. Their mean age was 33 +/- 9.0 years, with female predominance (23:2). There were nine greenhouse and six hospital workers. Latex-induced reactions included systemic anaphylaxis in nine patients (36%). Average total IgE was 161 kU/L, and it was within normal limits in 16 cases. Latex skin prick tests had excellent diagnostic precision with no adverse reactions, and CAP for latex diagnostic sensitivity was 80%. Forty-two food allergies were diagnosed in 13 of our patients (52%), and 23 of these consisted of systemic anaphylaxis. The most frequent food hypersensitivities were to avocado (9), chestnut (9), banana (7), kiwi (5) and papaya (3). Through RAST-inhibition, cross-reactivity among latex, avocado, chestnut, and banana was demonstrated. CONCLUSIONS: In our experience, latex allergy affects middle-aged women in certain professions at increased risk. Our data suggest the existence of a "latex-fruit syndrome," because 52% of our latex allergic patients had allergies to certain fruits. SN - 0003-4738 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7943998/Latex_allergy:_clinical_features_and_cross_reactivity_with_fruits_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/foodallergy.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -