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Maternal-fetal transport of immunoglobulin G and its subclasses during the third trimester of human pregnancy.
Am J Reprod Immunol 1994; 32(1):8-14AJ

Abstract

PROBLEM

We determined the maternal-fetal transport of immunoglobulin G (IgG) during the third trimester of human pregnancy.

METHOD

The concentration of IgG and its subclasses (IgG1-4) was determined in sera of blood samples from 38 pregnancies collected at the time of delivery from a peripheral maternal vein (MV) and from the placental umbilical artery (UA) and vein (UV). Gestational age varied between 28 and 42 weeks (WG).

RESULT

Whereas placental weight showed a significant correlation with gestational age, the maternal level of IgG and the ratio of its subclasses did not vary with gestational age. At 28-33 WG (n = 15) the mean values in the UA (5.91 +/- 1.53 g/l) and UV (6.41 +/- 1.57 g/l) for total IgG concentration were lower than in the MV (10.74 +/- 2.55 g/l). At the end of gestation (37-42 WG, n = 12), IgG in both UA (11.21 +/- 1.95 g/l) and UV (12.26 +/- 2.06 g/l) exceeded the maternal concentration (9.69 +/- 1.84 g/l). In addition to the significant positive correlation between IgG concentration in the fetal circulation (UV + UA) and gestational age (28-42 WG), an increase in the positive difference between UV and UA at the end of pregnancy indicates that there is a substantial rise in placental IgG transport capacity.

CONCLUSION

All four subclasses IgG1-4 were detectable in the umbilical circulation (28-42 WG). Whereas IgG3 and IgG4 in UA and UV had a similar concentration as in MV and remained unchanged, IgG2 increased with gestation from 0.67/0.74 g/l (UA/UV, 28-33 WG) to 1.29/1.58 g/l (UA/UV, 37-42 WG), but nevertheless remained lower than the level found in the MV (2.65 +/- 1.12 g/l). The main increase in IgG concentration, however, was due to the substantial rise in the transport of IgG1, which increased from 4.37 +/- 1.24 (UA) and 4.94 +/- 1.52 g/l (UV) at 28-33 WG to 8.94 +/- 1.66 (UA) and 10.89 +/- 1.96 g/l (UV) at the end of gestation, which was even higher than the overall IgG concentration in MV.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Berne, Switzerland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7945815

Citation

Malek, A, et al. "Maternal-fetal Transport of Immunoglobulin G and Its Subclasses During the Third Trimester of Human Pregnancy." American Journal of Reproductive Immunology (New York, N.Y. : 1989), vol. 32, no. 1, 1994, pp. 8-14.
Malek A, Sager R, Schneider H. Maternal-fetal transport of immunoglobulin G and its subclasses during the third trimester of human pregnancy. Am J Reprod Immunol. 1994;32(1):8-14.
Malek, A., Sager, R., & Schneider, H. (1994). Maternal-fetal transport of immunoglobulin G and its subclasses during the third trimester of human pregnancy. American Journal of Reproductive Immunology (New York, N.Y. : 1989), 32(1), pp. 8-14.
Malek A, Sager R, Schneider H. Maternal-fetal Transport of Immunoglobulin G and Its Subclasses During the Third Trimester of Human Pregnancy. Am J Reprod Immunol. 1994;32(1):8-14. PubMed PMID: 7945815.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Maternal-fetal transport of immunoglobulin G and its subclasses during the third trimester of human pregnancy. AU - Malek,A, AU - Sager,R, AU - Schneider,H, PY - 1994/8/1/pubmed PY - 1994/8/1/medline PY - 1994/8/1/entrez SP - 8 EP - 14 JF - American journal of reproductive immunology (New York, N.Y. : 1989) JO - Am. J. Reprod. Immunol. VL - 32 IS - 1 N2 - PROBLEM: We determined the maternal-fetal transport of immunoglobulin G (IgG) during the third trimester of human pregnancy. METHOD: The concentration of IgG and its subclasses (IgG1-4) was determined in sera of blood samples from 38 pregnancies collected at the time of delivery from a peripheral maternal vein (MV) and from the placental umbilical artery (UA) and vein (UV). Gestational age varied between 28 and 42 weeks (WG). RESULT: Whereas placental weight showed a significant correlation with gestational age, the maternal level of IgG and the ratio of its subclasses did not vary with gestational age. At 28-33 WG (n = 15) the mean values in the UA (5.91 +/- 1.53 g/l) and UV (6.41 +/- 1.57 g/l) for total IgG concentration were lower than in the MV (10.74 +/- 2.55 g/l). At the end of gestation (37-42 WG, n = 12), IgG in both UA (11.21 +/- 1.95 g/l) and UV (12.26 +/- 2.06 g/l) exceeded the maternal concentration (9.69 +/- 1.84 g/l). In addition to the significant positive correlation between IgG concentration in the fetal circulation (UV + UA) and gestational age (28-42 WG), an increase in the positive difference between UV and UA at the end of pregnancy indicates that there is a substantial rise in placental IgG transport capacity. CONCLUSION: All four subclasses IgG1-4 were detectable in the umbilical circulation (28-42 WG). Whereas IgG3 and IgG4 in UA and UV had a similar concentration as in MV and remained unchanged, IgG2 increased with gestation from 0.67/0.74 g/l (UA/UV, 28-33 WG) to 1.29/1.58 g/l (UA/UV, 37-42 WG), but nevertheless remained lower than the level found in the MV (2.65 +/- 1.12 g/l). The main increase in IgG concentration, however, was due to the substantial rise in the transport of IgG1, which increased from 4.37 +/- 1.24 (UA) and 4.94 +/- 1.52 g/l (UV) at 28-33 WG to 8.94 +/- 1.66 (UA) and 10.89 +/- 1.96 g/l (UV) at the end of gestation, which was even higher than the overall IgG concentration in MV. SN - 1046-7408 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7945815/Maternal_fetal_transport_of_immunoglobulin_G_and_its_subclasses_during_the_third_trimester_of_human_pregnancy_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=1046-7408&date=1994&volume=32&issue=1&spage=8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -