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[A patient with aneurysm of extracranial internal carotid artery presenting lower cranial polyneuropathy similar to Tapia's syndrome].
Rinsho Shinkeigaku. 1994 Jul; 34(7):707-11.RS

Abstract

Tapia's syndrome, first described in 1904 by A.G. Tapia, is considered to be a syndrome consisting of ipsilateral hemiplegia of larynx and tongue with spared movement of soft palate. A 61-year-old Japanese woman had been in good health until August 1991, when she developed hoarseness and atrophy of the left side of her tongue. Although she also showed mild disturbance of elevation of bilateral soft palates and loss of taste in the posterior third of her tongue as well, the main symptoms were the paralyses of the ipsilateral larynx and tongue without involvement of the ipsilateral sternocleidomastoid and trapezius muscles. We concluded that she had cranial polyneuropathy similar to that of Tapia's syndrome. A carotid angiography revealed that she has a large aneurysm, which originated from the extracranial internal carotid artery in the region near the skull base. No other abnormal findings were detected by any computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging or 67Ga-scintigraphy. The patient's lower cranial polyneuropathy was considered to be caused by the aneurysm. A survey of the literature indicates that extracranial carotid aneurysm is an extremely rare cause of Tapia's syndrome. In this case, the location of the aneurysm, which was present considerably distant from the skull base, seems to be the reason for the sparing of the accessory nerve.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, Niigata University.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
English Abstract
Journal Article

Language

jpn

PubMed ID

7955729

Citation

Shimohata, T, et al. "[A Patient With Aneurysm of Extracranial Internal Carotid Artery Presenting Lower Cranial Polyneuropathy Similar to Tapia's Syndrome]." Rinsho Shinkeigaku = Clinical Neurology, vol. 34, no. 7, 1994, pp. 707-11.
Shimohata T, Nakano R, Sato S, et al. [A patient with aneurysm of extracranial internal carotid artery presenting lower cranial polyneuropathy similar to Tapia's syndrome]. Rinsho Shinkeigaku. 1994;34(7):707-11.
Shimohata, T., Nakano, R., Sato, S., & Tsuji, S. (1994). [A patient with aneurysm of extracranial internal carotid artery presenting lower cranial polyneuropathy similar to Tapia's syndrome]. Rinsho Shinkeigaku = Clinical Neurology, 34(7), 707-11.
Shimohata T, et al. [A Patient With Aneurysm of Extracranial Internal Carotid Artery Presenting Lower Cranial Polyneuropathy Similar to Tapia's Syndrome]. Rinsho Shinkeigaku. 1994;34(7):707-11. PubMed PMID: 7955729.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [A patient with aneurysm of extracranial internal carotid artery presenting lower cranial polyneuropathy similar to Tapia's syndrome]. AU - Shimohata,T, AU - Nakano,R, AU - Sato,S, AU - Tsuji,S, PY - 1994/7/1/pubmed PY - 1994/7/1/medline PY - 1994/7/1/entrez SP - 707 EP - 11 JF - Rinsho shinkeigaku = Clinical neurology JO - Rinsho Shinkeigaku VL - 34 IS - 7 N2 - Tapia's syndrome, first described in 1904 by A.G. Tapia, is considered to be a syndrome consisting of ipsilateral hemiplegia of larynx and tongue with spared movement of soft palate. A 61-year-old Japanese woman had been in good health until August 1991, when she developed hoarseness and atrophy of the left side of her tongue. Although she also showed mild disturbance of elevation of bilateral soft palates and loss of taste in the posterior third of her tongue as well, the main symptoms were the paralyses of the ipsilateral larynx and tongue without involvement of the ipsilateral sternocleidomastoid and trapezius muscles. We concluded that she had cranial polyneuropathy similar to that of Tapia's syndrome. A carotid angiography revealed that she has a large aneurysm, which originated from the extracranial internal carotid artery in the region near the skull base. No other abnormal findings were detected by any computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging or 67Ga-scintigraphy. The patient's lower cranial polyneuropathy was considered to be caused by the aneurysm. A survey of the literature indicates that extracranial carotid aneurysm is an extremely rare cause of Tapia's syndrome. In this case, the location of the aneurysm, which was present considerably distant from the skull base, seems to be the reason for the sparing of the accessory nerve. SN - 0009-918X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7955729/[A_patient_with_aneurysm_of_extracranial_internal_carotid_artery_presenting_lower_cranial_polyneuropathy_similar_to_Tapia's_syndrome]_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/paralysis.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -