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Emergency contraception: a review.
Contraception. 1994 Aug; 50(2):101-8.C

Abstract

In the Netherlands, many women use a postcoital method of contraception in "emergency" situations. Postcoital contraception started in the 1960's with the administration of large doses of estrogens: 50 mg diethylstilbestrol for 5 days or 5 mg ethinylestradiol for 5 days. In the eighties, a double-blind study compared the original hormonal therapy of 5 mg ethinylestradiol for 5 days with a combination pill containing just 0.1 mg in combination with 1 mg d1-norgestrel, of which two doses are give, the second 12 hours after the first. This method was as effective in preventing pregnancy as the original treatment with high estrogen dosage. Moreover, it resulted in women suffering less nausea and vomiting. One study from Hong Kong indicated that levonorgestrel without ethinylestradiol was as effective as the combination. Postcoital use of an intrauterine device to prevent pregnancy can be used as an alternative to the hormonal method. A recent development is the use of an antiprogestagen pill: 600 mg Mifepristone on day 27 of the cycle; side effects are minimal and the success rate is high. Mifepristone should be registered and made available in all countries for this indication.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Gynecology, University of Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7956209

Citation

Haspels, A A.. "Emergency Contraception: a Review." Contraception, vol. 50, no. 2, 1994, pp. 101-8.
Haspels AA. Emergency contraception: a review. Contraception. 1994;50(2):101-8.
Haspels, A. A. (1994). Emergency contraception: a review. Contraception, 50(2), 101-8.
Haspels AA. Emergency Contraception: a Review. Contraception. 1994;50(2):101-8. PubMed PMID: 7956209.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Emergency contraception: a review. A1 - Haspels,A A, PY - 1994/8/1/pubmed PY - 1994/8/1/medline PY - 1994/8/1/entrez KW - Biology KW - Contraception KW - Contraceptive Agents KW - Contraceptive Agents, Estrogen KW - Contraceptive Agents, Female KW - Contraceptive Agents, Postcoital KW - Contraceptive Agents, Progestin KW - Contraceptive Methods KW - Contraceptive Mode Of Action KW - Developed Countries KW - Endocrine System KW - Ethinyl Estradiol KW - Europe KW - Family Planning KW - Hormone Antagonists KW - Hormones KW - Iud KW - Iud, Copper Releasing KW - Levonorgestrel KW - Literature Review KW - Netherlands KW - Physiology KW - Ru-486 KW - Western Europe SP - 101 EP - 8 JF - Contraception JO - Contraception VL - 50 IS - 2 N2 - In the Netherlands, many women use a postcoital method of contraception in "emergency" situations. Postcoital contraception started in the 1960's with the administration of large doses of estrogens: 50 mg diethylstilbestrol for 5 days or 5 mg ethinylestradiol for 5 days. In the eighties, a double-blind study compared the original hormonal therapy of 5 mg ethinylestradiol for 5 days with a combination pill containing just 0.1 mg in combination with 1 mg d1-norgestrel, of which two doses are give, the second 12 hours after the first. This method was as effective in preventing pregnancy as the original treatment with high estrogen dosage. Moreover, it resulted in women suffering less nausea and vomiting. One study from Hong Kong indicated that levonorgestrel without ethinylestradiol was as effective as the combination. Postcoital use of an intrauterine device to prevent pregnancy can be used as an alternative to the hormonal method. A recent development is the use of an antiprogestagen pill: 600 mg Mifepristone on day 27 of the cycle; side effects are minimal and the success rate is high. Mifepristone should be registered and made available in all countries for this indication. SN - 0010-7824 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7956209/Emergency_contraception:_a_review_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/0010-7824(94)90046-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -