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Free radicals in inflammatory bowel diseases pathophysiology and therapeutic implications.
Hepatogastroenterology 1994; 41(4):320-7H

Abstract

Inflammatory bowel diseases are characterized by the accumulation of granulocytes and monocytes/macrophages at the site of inflammation. Activation of these cells leads to the release of degradative enzymes, e.g., proteinases and glycosidases, and the production of reactive oxygen metabolites. This has been shown both in animal models of experimental intestinal injury, and in human inflammatory bowel disease. Scavenging of oxygen radicals protected tissue from damage in experimental inflammation models. Human studies with specific oxygen radical scavengers are rare, preliminary results appear promising. The fact that the aminosalicylates used in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease are potent antioxidants underscores the important role of reactive oxygen metabolites in this setting.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Klinik und Poliklinik für Innere Medizin I, Universität Regensburg, Germany.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7959565

Citation

Gross, V, et al. "Free Radicals in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases Pathophysiology and Therapeutic Implications." Hepato-gastroenterology, vol. 41, no. 4, 1994, pp. 320-7.
Gross V, Arndt H, Andus T, et al. Free radicals in inflammatory bowel diseases pathophysiology and therapeutic implications. Hepatogastroenterology. 1994;41(4):320-7.
Gross, V., Arndt, H., Andus, T., Palitzsch, K. D., & Schölmerich, J. (1994). Free radicals in inflammatory bowel diseases pathophysiology and therapeutic implications. Hepato-gastroenterology, 41(4), pp. 320-7.
Gross V, et al. Free Radicals in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases Pathophysiology and Therapeutic Implications. Hepatogastroenterology. 1994;41(4):320-7. PubMed PMID: 7959565.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Free radicals in inflammatory bowel diseases pathophysiology and therapeutic implications. AU - Gross,V, AU - Arndt,H, AU - Andus,T, AU - Palitzsch,K D, AU - Schölmerich,J, PY - 1994/8/1/pubmed PY - 1994/8/1/medline PY - 1994/8/1/entrez SP - 320 EP - 7 JF - Hepato-gastroenterology JO - Hepatogastroenterology VL - 41 IS - 4 N2 - Inflammatory bowel diseases are characterized by the accumulation of granulocytes and monocytes/macrophages at the site of inflammation. Activation of these cells leads to the release of degradative enzymes, e.g., proteinases and glycosidases, and the production of reactive oxygen metabolites. This has been shown both in animal models of experimental intestinal injury, and in human inflammatory bowel disease. Scavenging of oxygen radicals protected tissue from damage in experimental inflammation models. Human studies with specific oxygen radical scavengers are rare, preliminary results appear promising. The fact that the aminosalicylates used in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease are potent antioxidants underscores the important role of reactive oxygen metabolites in this setting. SN - 0172-6390 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7959565/Free_radicals_in_inflammatory_bowel_diseases_pathophysiology_and_therapeutic_implications_ L2 - https://www.lens.org/lens/search?q=citation_id:7959565 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -